Shrimp, sautéed in a tomato and bell pepper sauce, with creamed corn and feta. PICTURE: Andrew Scrivani/The New York Times
Shrimp With Creamed Corn and Feta (Serves 4)

The combination is an inauthentic take on shrimp and grits, with the feta providing a briny, tangy offset to the sweetness of the kernels.

Ingredients

680g extra-large peeled shrimp
3/4 teaspoon kosher salt, more to taste
3 garlic cloves, finely grated or minced
5 tablespoons unsalted butter
1/4 cup heavy cream
4 cups corn kernels (from 6 to 7 ears corn)
1/2 cup crumbled feta cheese, more for serving
Black pepper, to taste
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 small red onions, diced
1 large poblano chili or green bell pepper, diced
2 large ripe tomatoes, diced
2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
Large dash of Worcestershire sauce
Dash of hot sauce, preferably Tabasco
Cilantro leaves, for serving
Basil leaves, for serving

Method

In a large bowl, toss shrimp with salt and garlic and let rest in the refrigerator until needed (up to 2 hours).
In a medium saucepan, melt 1 tablespoon butter with the cream over medium heat. Add corn, cover, reduce heat to medium-low, and cook, stirring once or twice, until the corn is very soft, 10 to 15 minutes. If all the moisture evaporates before the corn is soft, add a few teaspoons water to the pan.
Using an immersion blender or regular blender, blend corn mixture until you get a chunky purée. Mix in feta, black pepper and salt to taste. Cover and keep warm until needed.
In a large pan, heat oil over medium-high heat. Add onion and pepper and sauté until pale golden and soft, 7 minutes. 
Add tomatoes, a large pinch of salt, and a tablespoon or two of water if the pan looks dry, and sauté until the tomatoes break down and turn saucelike, about 8 minutes.
Add shrimp, lemon juice and Worcestershire and hot sauces. Sauté until the shrimp are pink and cooked through, 2 to 4 minutes. 
Stir remaining butter into pan and add more salt, if needed.
Serve corn topped with shrimp and plenty of crumbled feta. 
Garnish with cilantro and basil.

The New York Times