Eggs are a good source of biotin, which is an important nutrient used in fat and sugar metabolism. It's also known as vitamin B7, or vitamin H. Picture: Pexels
Eggs are a good source of biotin, which is an important nutrient used in fat and sugar metabolism. It's also known as vitamin B7, or vitamin H. Picture: Pexels

Eggs, the breakfast of champions

By Viwe Ndongeni-Ntlebi Time of article published Apr 23, 2020

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An egg for breakfast is absolutely the best thing you can do to stave off hunger for the entire morning.

People eat eggs for breakfast or throughout the day because of its versatility. 

Eggs are a good source of biotin, which is an important nutrient used in fat and sugar metabolism. It's also known as vitamin B7, or vitamin H.

However, many fear that eating an egg may pose a treat to their heart health.

Researchers have slammed the health risks associated with eggs. They found that moderate egg intake, which is about one egg per day, does not increase the risk of cardiovascular disease or premature death in healthy people. 

A Canadian analysis of three long-term multinational studies found that even if people have a history of cardiovascular disease or diabetes, moderate egg intake does not increase the risk of cardiovascular disease or premature death.

Mashid Dehghan, one of the investigators says: “No association was found between egg intake and blood cholesterol, its components or other risk factors. These results are robust and widely applicable to both healthy individuals and those with vascular disease”

The researchers are from the Population Health Research Institute (PHRI) of McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences and reported their results in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition of January, 2020.

They analysed three international studies conducted by the PHRI. Egg consumption of 146,011 individuals from 21 countries was recorded in one study (PURE) and in 31 544 patients with vascular disease from two other studies (ONTARGET and TRANSCEND) coming to a total of about 177 000 individuals.

Salim Yusuf, principal investigator, explains that the data from these three studies involved populations from a total of 50 countries in 6 continents at different income levels and from different cultures, so the results are widely applicable. Previous studies on egg consumption and diseases have been contradictory, “This is because most of these studies were relatively small or moderate in size and did not include individuals from a large number of countries,” he said.  Also, many of these studies were done in high-income countries.

The results suggest that moderate egg intake of one egg a day is safe, says Mahshid Dehghan. “Moderate egg intake, which is about one egg per day in most people, does not increase the risk of cardiovascular disease or mortality, even if people have a history of cardiovascular disease or diabetes,” she said.

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