The experts were also sceptical about crystal water bottles, sold by actress Gwyneth Paltrow’s lifestyle website Goop, which claim to "infuse water with positive energy". Picture: Reuters
The experts were also sceptical about crystal water bottles, sold by actress Gwyneth Paltrow’s lifestyle website Goop, which claim to "infuse water with positive energy". Picture: Reuters

The celebrity health fads that just don't work

By VICTORIA ALLEN Time of article published Dec 12, 2019

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London - From plant-based diets to amethyst-infused water, celebrity health fads seem to offer silver bullets to help you get into shape.

But dietitians have hit out at such fashionable trends, describing them as "laughable" and in some cases dangerous.

Experts at the British Dietetic Association (BDA) have compiled a list of the five most bizarre trends from 2019, to warn people against following them.

These include the "party girl drip" – reportedly enjoyed by Simon Cowell and Adele – which it is said fixes hangovers and burns fat.

The BDA says there is no evidence the intravenous vitamin infusions are beneficial, adding they are potentially dangerous as they come with risks of infection and blood clots. 

The BDA’s Marcela Fiuza said: "Even if no complications occur, you will probably just excrete at least 90 percent of what’s being infused – it is literally money down the toilet."

The experts were also sceptical about crystal water bottles, sold by actress Gwyneth Paltrow’s lifestyle website Goop, which claim to "infuse water with positive energy".

The association’s Claire Pettit, dismissed the alleged health benefits as "not evidence-based".

And chewable "hair gummies" produced by firm Sugarbearhair and promoted by reality TV star Kim Kardashian were described as no better than a balanced diet including fruit and vegetables.

A 22-day plant-based diet, which singer Beyonce shared on social media this year, also faced criticism. The BDA described it as a good way to "kick-start a better way of eating", but added it will take longer to "eat optimally".

The fifth debunked trend is "fat-shaming", adopted by the likes of presenter Piers Morgan, the BDA said. 

People feeling ashamed does not help them lose weight, it added. BDA chairperson Caroline Bovey said: "People need practical solutions based on compassion and support, not quick fixes and simplistic solutions."

Daily Mail

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