The study found that overall levels of prostate cancer were the same, whether or not men took the cholesterol-busting pills. Picture: File photo

London - Men who take statins are 24 percent less likely to get an aggressive form of prostate cancer, a study suggests.

Scientists tracked more than 44 000 British men over more than two decades and found that those on statins were less likely to die from the disease.

The study found that overall levels of prostate cancer were the same, whether or not men took the cholesterol-busting pills.

But those who had taken them had a 24 percent reduced risk of developing a more aggressive type of the illness.

The researchers, from Queen’s University Belfast, suggested this is because statins affect inflammation and immunity levels in the prostate gland.

It backs up other research which showing that patients taking statins are less likely to die from other cancers.

The study’s lead author, Dr Emma Allott of Queen’s University Belfast, said: "Some prostate cancers are slow growing and will not affect the man over the course of his lifetime, but others are aggressive and often deadly."

During the study, published in the journal Clinical Cancer Research, scientists monitored 44 126 men from 1990 to 2014.

In related news, fears that statins can cause memory loss are unfounded, a major study suggests.

In fact, the drugs may even protect against forgetfulness in some individuals, the researchers said.

Doctors said the findings should reassure patients using statins that it is safe to take them. Concerns that they may damage cognitive health has made some reluctant to take the drugs.

The Australian researchers examined changes in the memory and brain function of 1 037 individuals aged 70 to 90 over six years. They used 13 different tests and brain scans. On average, participants had been on statins for nine years.

Daily Mail