The next GT-R could take inspiration from the Vision Gran Turismo Concept.
The next GT-R could take inspiration from the Vision Gran Turismo Concept.
The next GT-R could take inspiration from the Vision Gran Turismo Concept.
The next GT-R could take inspiration from the Vision Gran Turismo Concept.
The next GT-R could take inspiration from the Vision Gran Turismo Concept.
The next GT-R could take inspiration from the Vision Gran Turismo Concept.

There is good news and bad news for fans of Nissan’s Godzilla. 

The good news is that after more than a decade of subtle updates it will be replaced by an all-new vehicle, eventually.

That’s the bad news.. Nissan’s next-generation GT-R is still in the early stages of development and is unlikely to hit the streets before the early 2020s.

However, there is certainly much to look forward to, with Nissan’s design boss Alfonso Albaisa bragging that the new GT-R will be “the fastest super sports car in the world”. 

Albaisa made the claim in an interview with Autocar at the Goodwood Festival of Speed over the weekend, where he also confirmed the new-gen sports car would ride on an all-new platform and boast a design that’s “something really special” and “more brick than wing”.

With that in mind, the new design could certainly take inspiration from the blocky Vision Gran Turismo Concept of 2014.

However, Albaisa also stated that the exterior design could not be finalised until all the key decisions on powertrain and platform had been made.

On that note, the design head admitted to the British publication that Nissan had not yet decided whether there would be any kind of electrification - though that was certainly likely. “It has to play the advanced technology game,” Albaisa told Autocar, “but that doesn’t mean it has to be electric.”

The current GT-R has been on the market since 2007, but has been given regular updates along the way, including performance upgrades.

In its latest iteration, the 3.8-litre twin-turbo V6 pushes 408kW and 632Nm, and gets the GT-R from zero to 100km/h in 3.8 seconds, according to our high-altitude Gauteng-based performance tests.

IOL Motoring