Lamborghini teases 620kW hypercar for the track

By Motoring Staff Time of article published Jun 24, 2020

Share this article:

Sant’Agata Bolognese, Italy - Trying to design a car that works perfectly on both the road and the track is always going to be an engineering compromise thanks to the many legal hurdles that exist for road cars. And that’s why Lamborghini Squadra Corse’s upcoming SCV12 hypercar is going to be for track use only.

Teased in disguised prototype form ahead of its imminent reveal, the SCV12 is going to be Lamborghini’s most powerful V12 car ever, with an output said to exceed 619kW.

The SCV12 will be fully assembled at the Lamborghini Squadra Corse facility in Sant’Agata Bolognese, Italy, and volumes will be limited.

But there is a rather special driving experience to look forward to. Customers will get to participate in advanced driving programmes at some of the world’s most prestigious race tracks, while also enjoying the technical support of Squadra Corse engineers, and the special tutoring of five-time Le Mans winner Emanuele Pirro.

The hypercar’s V12 engine will feed its power exclusively to the rear wheels, through a six-speed sequential gearbox, which also acts as a structural element within the chassis, in order to enhance weight distribution.

To minimise weight while maximising rigidity, the SCV12 will have a new, fully carbon fibre chassis, as well as numerous race-car-specific features devised by Squadra Corse engineers.

The pushrod rear suspension will be installed directly on the gearbox. 

The SCV12 is fitted with magnesium wheels, measuring 19 inches up front and 20” at the back, and they’re shod with specially developed Pirelli slicks.

The Squadra Corse team have paid a great deal of attention to aerodynamics too, as Lamborghini explains:

“The SCV12 benefits from Lamborghini Squadra Corse’s GT motorsport expertise, using its racing experience to produce increased aerodynamic efficiency and higher downforce levels than a GT3 car.”

The hypercar’s bonnet, for instance, has a double air intake and a central rib to redirect airflow to the ram-air intake scoop on the roof. This directs dynamic air pressure created by the car’s movement to increase static air pressure in the engine’s intake manifold, creating greater airflow through the engine and increasing power. 

Also aiding its aerodynamic cause is a prominent splitter at the front as well as lateral flicks and vertical fins on the side sills, while a custom-built carbon fibre wing takes pride of place at the back end.

IOL Motoring


Share this article: