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LOOK: Mali’s record-breaking nonuplets in great health on first birthday, says father

Exactly a year ago to the day, the world's only nonuplets – nine babies born at the same time – remain in perfect health as they celebrate their first birthday, their father has told the BBC on Wednesday. File Photo.

Exactly a year ago to the day, the world's only nonuplets – nine babies born at the same time – remain in perfect health as they celebrate their first birthday, their father has told the BBC on Wednesday. File Photo.

Published May 4, 2022

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Cape Town - Exactly a year ago to the day, the world's only nonuplets – nine babies born at the same time – remain in perfect health as they celebrate their first birthday, their father told the BBC on Wednesday.

"They're all crawling now, the newborns (five girls and four boys). Some are sitting up and can even walk if they hold on to something," said dad, Abdelkader Arby, an officer in the Malian army, in a BBC report.

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According to the Daily Mail UK, Arby, 35, a sailor with the Mali navy, had to stay behind at their three-bedroom home in Timbuktu due to Covid restrictions and could only meet the babies for the first time in Morocco on July 9.

The four boys are called Mohammed, Bah, El Hadji and Oumar, while the five girls are named Hawa, Adama, Fatouma, Oumou and Kadidia.

The pregnancy of Halima Cisse, 25, fascinated the West African nation and attracted the attention of its leaders in 2021, especially when doctors in March last year said Cisse needed specialist care, and authorities flew her to Morocco where she gave birth, a Reuters report said.

Cisse was initially expected to give birth to seven babies, since two of the foetuses were not picked up in earlier examinations. All were delivered by caesarean section.

This was tweeted one year ago.

Nonuplets are extremely rare. Medical complications in multiple births of this kind often mean that some of the babies do not reach full term.

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