Zimbabwean businessman Frank Buyanga has again dismissed allegations that he was involved in corrupt land deals in his home country.

Johannesburg - Zimbabwean businessman Frank Buyanga - who is based in South Africa - has again dismissed allegations that he was involved in corrupt land deals in his home country, saying the ruling Zanu-PF party's bigwigs were being misled by the youth league.

Earlier this month, the Zanu-PF Youth League accused the businessman of corruption involving the acquisition and sale of residential stands, at a time when authorities have upped the ante in the fight against graft.

Zimbabwe’s newly constituted anti-graft body has been on blitz that has fingered senior government officials including Tourism Minister Prisca Mupfumira - who has since been arrested and sacked over graft allegations involving millions of US dollars.

Mupfumira is facing seven counts of corruption in relation to the $94 million that went missing from the state pension fund.

Another high flyer to be arrested was Principal Director Monitoring and evaluation in the Office of the President and Cabinet, Douglas Tapfuma.

Buyanga, who has previously denied the allegations, on Friday took issue with Zimbabwe's ruling Zanu-PF party, which he said was being misled by its youth league. He claimed the youth league was using the anti-corruption blitz by authorities as guise to target individuals.

Last week, the businessman demanded that Zanu-PF Youth League leader Lewis Matutu provides evidence of any wrong doing. So far no such evidence has been made public.

Buyanga said he wants to remind Matutu that he has been at the forefront of fighting corruption in Zimbabwe, even during the Robert Mugabe era. He said since 2013 he has has been calling for an economic surveillance and monitoring unit under the Presidency.

The Hamilton Group founder produced letters in which he implores Zimbabwe government leaders to act against rampant corruption, especially in parastatals.

In a letter dated 30 September 2016, Buyanga tells state residences director, Innocent Tizora, that “… as a national duty, I would only be willing to assist … uncorrupted security sectors. It is not only obvious to the naked eye, but reports on the police and anti-corruption sectors leave a lot to be desired suggesting further that a total weed out of bad apples, if not saboteurs, within these crucial socio-economic segments of law enforcement and State-owned enterprises would help regain confidence for the much-needed recovery”.

But now that the youth league has fingered the businessman alleging that he bought and sold land in Zimbabwe in an under hand manner it remains to be seen what action the anti-corruption unit will take.

For his part Buyanga, who appears to be on a collision course with Zanu-PF over the graft allegations, is ready to declare his innocence to anyone who cares to listen.

Zimbabwe's economy is in meltdown. In the past Buyanga has mentioned the millions of US dollars he says he has invested in that country.

African News Agency (ANA)