General Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo, Deputy Head of the Sudan Transitional Military Council and Alhadi Idris, Chairman of the Sudanese Revolutionary Front, hold the agreement on peace and ceasefire during the signing ceremony in Juba.
General Mohamed Hamdan Dagalo, Deputy Head of the Sudan Transitional Military Council and Alhadi Idris, Chairman of the Sudanese Revolutionary Front, hold the agreement on peace and ceasefire during the signing ceremony in Juba.

Sudan to strike landmark peace deal in bid to end decades of conflict

By Chad Williams Time of article published Oct 5, 2020

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Cape Town - Sudan is set to strike a landmark peace deal on Saturday, ending decades of conflict which has seen thousands of people die.

According to reports, both sides are due to sign the deal in full on Saturday in Juba, the capital of neighbouring South Sudan, after putting their initials on the agreement at the end of last month.

Members of the South Sudanese mediation team and the delegation of the Sudan Revolutionary Front (SRF) rebel alliance have returned to Juba to attend the final signing ceremony of the Juba Peace Agreement, along with a large delegation from Khartoum headed by Sovereign Council Vice President Lt Gen Mohamed Hamdan ‘Hemeti’, writes Dabanga Radio.

According to the Sudan Tribune, the Sudanese Communist Party Thursday rejected the Juba Agreement for Peace in Sudan, describing it as a threat to the revolution, peace and Sudan’s unity.

The report further revealed that the Communist Party issued a strong statement rejecting the peace agreement with the Sudanese Revolutionary Front (SRF) and the Sudan Liberation Movement.

The statement said that this deal is a repeat of previous bilateral experiences and partial solutions that end with power-sharing and positions for negotiators at the expense of the cause of the affected regions, writes the Sudan Tribune.

Meanwhile, this week, hundreds of people demonstrated in the capital, Khartoum, on Wednesday, to protest the deteriorating economic conditions and chanted slogans calling for the removal of the Hamdok government, writes Sudan Tribune.

The Sudanese Transitional government which was formed in 2019 has made a number of reforms in its transition to democracy, but many citizens believe that change is happening to slowly.

Sudan has been engulfed in conflict between the Arab-dominated government that was led by Omar al-Bashir for 30 years and rebels drawn from non-Arab ethnic groups.

Multiple civil wars have raged since independence in 1956, including the 1983-2005 war that led to the secession of the south.

According to the United Nations, the devastating war in Darfur from 2003 left at least 300,000 people dead and 2.5 million displaced in its early years, reports Al Jazeera.

African News Agency (ANA)

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