Independent Online

Wednesday, July 6, 2022

Like us on FacebookFollow us on TwitterView weather by locationView market indicators

Computers stolen during break-in at City of Tshwane’s licensing centre

Tshwane mayor Randall Williams. File Picture: Jacques Naude African News Agency (ANA)

Tshwane mayor Randall Williams. File Picture: Jacques Naude African News Agency (ANA)

Published May 26, 2022

Share

Pretoria - City of Tshwane has said there was a break-in at its licensing centre in Centurion, which led to disruption of services.

Spokesperson Lindela Mashigo said at least 35 computers were stolen during the burglary.

Story continues below Advertisement

“The Roads and Transport Department would like to inform residents about the disruption of services at the Centurion Licensing Centre, due to a break-in that occurred last night, whereby a total of 35 computers were stolen,” said Mashigo.

Services, including driving licence renewals and registration, and licensing of motor vehicles, are currently suspended until further notice.

Mashigo said the affected facility will continue to render services of application and testing for driving licences, and application and testing for learner licences.

“The matter has been reported to the South African Police Service (SAPS) who are busy with further investigations,” Mashigo added.

Residents have been urged to use alternative centres, including Waltloo, Rayton, Akasia, and Bronkhorstspruit.

“The city apologises for the inconvenience caused,” said Mashigo.

Story continues below Advertisement

Previously, the City of Tshwane had had to make alternative plans to provide some licensing department services, after three city offices were hit by a spate of break-ins and thefts, and two were forced to close down, in 2017.

The Waltloo, Akasia and Centurion licensing departments were burgled and equipment was stolen, leaving Waltloo and Centurion unable to provide services and, therefore, closed to the public.

At the time, the mayoral committee member for community safety Derrick Kissoonduth said the computers stolen at the Centurion licensing centre were “special and unique computers” which were only issued by the national Department of Transport.

Story continues below Advertisement

“We have to get direction from a national level. As the city, we have our hands tied,” said Kissoonduth.

IOL

Story continues below Advertisement

Share