Allegations against her and indications that SAA racked up millions of rands in losses during her tenure means Dudu Myeni has gone against the grain of what an effective chairperson is.
Author Chucks Okpaluba, in his book on public law, explains that accountability is one of the democratic values entrenched in the country’s Constitution.

On personal accountability, Laci Loew, vice president and principal analyst of the Brandon Hall Group, maintains it is when leaders are prepared to explain the “outcomes of their choices, behaviours and actions”.

Furthermore, in its description of what makes a good board chairperson, the Harvard Business Review, after running a survey, lists the qualities.

This, it says, includes being available, adding: “Although the majority of chairs we studied had part-time contracts with their companies, they were fully committed and put in the required time no matter what they’d agreed to.”

When former SAA board chairperson Dudu Myeni was appointed to the post 10 years ago, the notion was that she encompassed some of these traits.

However, allegations levelled against her and indications that SAA racked up millions of rands in losses during her tenure means she has gone against the grain of what an effective chairperson is.

As Myeni informed the North Pretoria High Court this week, in the case where Outa wants her declared a delinquent director, that she couldn’t afford to appear at court, her actions have made a mockery of good leadership.

This is not the first time she has not shown up to account.

In February 2018, Parliament’s portfolio committee on Public Enterprises remarked that her “delay tactics” bordered on undermining the process, after she indicated via an SMS on the morning of the hearings she was unable to come.

It appears through her recent actions that Myeni has little regard for the country’s laws and judiciary system.

From the onset, she was aware that she had to appear in court, and should have planned for it, including sorting out her legal affairs and “transport challenges”.

To compel the courts to dance to her tune and sit wondering if she will pitch up or not, is unacceptable and sets a bad precedent.

The trial has now been set for ­October 21.

Let’s hope Myeni will honour the new date so that she is at peace and can enjoy her birthday on October 29.