Former President Jacob Zuma turned himself in to police on Wednesday to begin 15 months in jail for contempt of court. Picture: Neil Baynes/African News Agency (ANA) Archives
Former President Jacob Zuma turned himself in to police on Wednesday to begin 15 months in jail for contempt of court. Picture: Neil Baynes/African News Agency (ANA) Archives

Cope welcomes Jacob Zuma’s incarceration

By Ntombi Nkosi Time of article published Jul 8, 2021

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Johannesburg – Cope has described the imprisonment of former president Jacob Zuma as a victory for the Constitution and the judiciary.

Just before midnight on Wednesday, a convoy of heavily armed police, in double cabs, panel vans and armoured Nyalas, started slowly approaching Zuma’s home in Nkandla, KwaZulu Natal.

Department of Correctional Services spokesperson Singabakho Nxumalo confirmed in a statement that Zuma was admitted to Estcourt Correctional Centre.

“The imprisonment of former President Jacob Zuma sends out a loud and clear message that nobody is above the law, not even the president of the country. This is surely a victory for our Constitution and the judiciary. Zuma and his supporters thought that they can undermine and disregard the rule of law,” said Cope spokesperson Dennis Bloem.

Bloem said the action reassures the country and the international community that the Constitution and the rule of law reign supreme.

He said the amount of threats of civil war or violence by Zuma supporters will deter the law enforcement agencies to execute their duty.

Video: Doctor Ngcobo/African News Agency (ANA)

“Cope expects that Zuma will not get preferential treatment in prison. He must be treated like all other sentenced inmates. We will monitor the correctional facility where he will be serving his sentence.

“We must be very harsh to anybody who wants to undermine or disrespect the laws of the country. The behaviour of Jacob Zuma was despicable and cannot be taken lightly’,” said Bloem.

He said Cope believes strongly that Zuma belongs in jail.

“He was criminally charged with contempt of court. He was supposed to appear before the commission and answer questions and he decided to walk out and show the commission the middle finger.

“We believe that the long arm of the law has eventually caught up with Zuma. He and his supporters never thought that this day will come. Nobody must ever think or believe that they are above the law. All are equal before the law,” Bloem said.

Zuma’s jailing drew mixed feelings from a deeply divided South African society. Zuma’s long-time supporters lamented the jailing while others celebrated it as a victory for the rule of law.

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Political Bureau

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