Helen Zille’s comments on farm murders are reckless, says IFP

By Sihle Mavuso Time of article published Nov 3, 2020

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Durban: The IFP has slammed newly re-elected DA’s federal council chairperson Helen Zille for claiming that farmers are more likely to be murdered in the country.

Blessed Gwala, the IFP’s spokesperson on community safety and liaison in the KwaZulu-Natal legislature said Zille’s comments are divisive.

He said, generally, there is an increase in crime in general and murders in South Africa. However, singling out a particular group as if it is the only one affected is dangerous and careless.

This was in response to Zille’s comment made on Talk Radio 702 on Monday where she claimed that she based on the fact that 58 people were killed daily in the country and with the farmer population currently sitting at around 40 000 nationwide, the group has become more vulnerable.

“I quickly did a calculation on the stats, Bongani (Bingwa of 702) gave. He said 58 people are murdered in SA a day. And 58 farmers per year. Working on 58 million people in SA and 40 000 farmers in SA it is a simple sum. You work it out on Bongani's figures,” Zille said in response.

Zille claimed that as a result of increasing farm murders, some were selling off while others were emigrating, thus threatening the country’s food security.

In response to Zille’s utterances, Gwala said such statements do not only incite violence but sow division amongst farmers, farmworkers and South Africans in general.

“The IFP is disappointed by these utterances, which could sow division in the agricultural sector, a backbone of South Africa's economy. We were hoping that the DA's new leadership would come up with new strategies in the right direction - especially in combating crime, instead of pre-empting the worst about the country.

“Statements like these fuel animosity and deepen the cracks we are experiencing in the farming sector, especially in the Free State and KwaZulu-Natal,"Gwala said. | Political Bureau

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