053 11/10/2012 Seanokeng Molosankwe trying a rhinose, is the latest weapon in the war against rhino poaching. It’s a plastic red rhino horn that you can buy for R30 from participating CNA stores from Monday next week, to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the first ever successful translocation of rhinos in SA, and to publicly highlight the incredible threat they are under today and raise money to fight poachers. Picture: Motshwari Mofokeng
053 11/10/2012 Seanokeng Molosankwe trying a rhinose, is the latest weapon in the war against rhino poaching. It’s a plastic red rhino horn that you can buy for R30 from participating CNA stores from Monday next week, to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the first ever successful translocation of rhinos in SA, and to publicly highlight the incredible threat they are under today and raise money to fight poachers. Picture: Motshwari Mofokeng

Rhinos to benefit from new appeal

By Time of article published Oct 12, 2012

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Cape Town - First there was the Red Nose appeal, then the blue (and red) plastic testicles hanging off the back of bakkies in shopping malls.

Now there’s rhinose, a proboscis that looks as though it might complete those red testicles, depending on how it is hung, but is actually the latest weapon in the war against rhino poaching.

It’s a plastic red rhino horn that you can buy for R30 from participating CNA stores from Monday to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the first ever successful translocation of rhinos in SA, and to highlight the threat they are under today and raise money to fight poachers.

Rhinose Day has been organised by the Rhino Action Group Effort (RAGE – a LeadSA initiative), the Endangered Wildlife Trust and the Rhinose Foundation.

Rhinose founder Andrew Paterson said: “Although we focus on rhino conservation, the plight of these giants is a symbol of the broader range of threats facing all wildlife and wilderness areas. The Rhinose allows everyone to contribute and costs just R30.”

RAGE spokesman Andy Rice said: “All funds will be audited by KPMG, ensuring a clear, transparent route from donation to project funding.”

In 1961, legendary conservationist Ian Player and his Natal Parks Board team darted and relocated four white rhinos in the iMfolozi Game Reserve and moved them to the Kruger National Park as part of Operation Rhino, the start of an epic campaign.

For more information, go to www.rhinoseday.com. Cape Argus

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