#NOTINMYNAME activists marching in Pretoria. File Picture: Bongani Shilubane/African News Agency (ANA)
#NOTINMYNAME activists marching in Pretoria. File Picture: Bongani Shilubane/African News Agency (ANA)

16 Days of Activism: #NotInMyName to march for rights of women in informal sector

By Jonisayi Maromo Time of article published Nov 25, 2021

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PRETORIA – In a bid to intensify campaigns to end gender-based violence in South Africa, the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture, Deputy Minister Nocawe Mafu will launch the Orange Day Campaign and 16 Days of Activism of No Violence Against Women and Children.

The launch will take place on Thursday, at the National Library of South Africa in Pretoria.

Hosted in collaboration with the UN Development Programme, the campaign, among others, seeks to reaffirm government’s stance on gender-based violence issues, and to galvanise action to end violence against women and girls around the world.

November 25 marks the Orange Day, a UNiTE to End Violence against Women Campaign launched globally by the UN in 2008.

The day has since been replicated in many countries including South Africa.

The colour “orange” symbolises a brighter future, free of violence.

To observe the 16 Days of Activism of No Violence Against Women and Children campaign, the department will also light the candles for the duration of the campaign.

Meanwhile, to mark the international 16 Days of Activism of No Violence Against Women and Children which kicked off today, civil rights movement #NotInMyName said it will be marching in Pretoria CBD to highlight the plight of women in the informal sector.

“The 16 Days of Activism campaign forms the centre point of #NotInMyName’s comprehensive 365 Days of Activism for No Violence Against Women and Children. During and beyond this 16 days period, #NotInMyName is going to focus on the plight of women in the informal trade industry,” said secretary-general Themba Masango.

“From street vendors and domestic workers to subsistence farmers and seasonal agriculture workers, women make up a disproportionate percentage of workers in the informal sector.”

He said working in the informal economy often leaves women without any protection of labour laws, social benefits such as pension, health care or paid sick leave.

“They routinely work for lower wages and in unsafe conditions, including risk of sexual harassment. The lack of social protection has long-term impact on women,” Masango said.

He said #NotInMyName in conjunction with Women In Action of Tshwane will be hosting an awareness march to highlight the struggle of informal traders and advocate for their rights.

The march will take place on Friday from Church Square in Pretoria CBD.

IOL

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