1/21/15 Police officer holds a Panga confiscated from one of the Pakistan's shop in Braamfischer, Soweto yesterday during police raid of illegal weapons in foreign owned shops. The looting of shops owned by Pakistanis is spreading quickly in Soweto after a 16 year-old was killed by a Pakistan shop owner this week in Snake Park,Soweto. Picture:Paballo Thekiso
1/21/15 Police officer holds a Panga confiscated from one of the Pakistan's shop in Braamfischer, Soweto yesterday during police raid of illegal weapons in foreign owned shops. The looting of shops owned by Pakistanis is spreading quickly in Soweto after a 16 year-old was killed by a Pakistan shop owner this week in Snake Park,Soweto. Picture:Paballo Thekiso

'Lack of compassion for foreigners'

By Time of article published Jan 24, 2015

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Johannesburg -

The unrest that flared up in Soweto and other areas this week showed a lack of compassion for foreign nationals trying to make a living in South Africa, Lawyers for Human Rights (LHR) said on Saturday.

“The LHR is shocked and disappointed by the blatant disregard for human life in these attacks and calls for a swift and efficient end to the violence,” said LHR attorney Patricia Erasmus in a statement.

“Although any situation of violence is complicated and a multitude of factors (including ordinary criminal elements) contribute to the chaos, an overwhelming number of victims are foreign shop owners - giving the attacks an apparently xenophobic appearance.”

The unrest in Soweto began on Monday when 14-year-old Siphiwe Mahori was shot dead allegedly by a Somalian shopkeeper, as Mahori and a group tried to rob his shop in Snake Park.

The shop owner, Senosi Yusuf, was expected to appear in the Protea Magistrate's Court on a charge of murder on Monday.

In another incident, a 19-year-old youth was shot in Naledi on Wednesday and declared dead at hospital. According to reports, the youth, Nhlanhla Monareng, was shot when police fired into a crowd gathered at a Pakistani-owned shop. He was a bystander.

Gauteng police commissioner Lt-General Lesetja Mothiba said the looting had since spread to Diepsloot, north of Johannesburg, and Kagiso, on the West Rand.

In Swaneville, a 61-year-old bystander was shot and killed when a foreigner fired at a crowd stoning his shop on Thursday night.

On the same day in Tshepisong, a man was wounded while allegedly trying to break into a spaza shop belonging to a foreigner.

“These deaths were all avoidable tragedies,” said Erasmus.

“These latest attacks demonstrate the continuing intolerance of foreign nationals in the country and the opportunistic crime that follows through the looting of their stores when they flee to safety.”

The LHR was also appalled by reports that some police officers stood by and did nothing to stop the violence and looting.

“However, we are pleased by the overall action by police to quell many of the attacks and making more than 120 arrests,” said Erasmus.

“It is now important that police conduct a proper and thorough investigation to ensure that justice is served.”

She said the LHR would be speaking to victims for statements to draw up a full account of the situation.

The African Diaspora Forum (ADF) said the violence made South Africa's reputation as “a united and rainbow nation” questionable.

“We are deeply worried about the current course of violence across the country and the lack of effective response from the government to deal with xenophobia,” it said in an open letter to President Jacob Zuma.

“Although the police were deployed and are working tirelessly to restore peace, there are no accountability structures for perpetrators. We appeal to you Zuma to assist in building structures that can restore cohesion and peace.” - Sapa

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