PROFESSIONAL nurse Percy Malahlela with an oral swab at the City of Tshwane screening site, at the Pierre van Ryneveld Shopping Centre, where they offer free Covid-19 testing for the public. Picture: Jacques Naude African News Agency (ANA)
PROFESSIONAL nurse Percy Malahlela with an oral swab at the City of Tshwane screening site, at the Pierre van Ryneveld Shopping Centre, where they offer free Covid-19 testing for the public. Picture: Jacques Naude African News Agency (ANA)

SA records more than 15 000 new Covid-19 cases, 122 deaths on Sunday

By IOL Reporter Time of article published Jun 27, 2021

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Cape Town - South Africa recorded 15 036 new Covid-19 cases and 122 deaths on Sunday, the National Health Department said.

“The cumulative number of Covid-19 cases reported in South Africa on June 27, 2021, is 1 928 897, with 15 036 new cases reported,” the department said on Twitter.

“There are 158 998 active cases in the country. There are 122 reported deaths, which brings the total to 59 900. The recovery rate is 88.7%.”

DAILY Covid-19 statistics for June 27, 2021. Source: National Health Department

The department released the statistics ahead of President Cyril Ramaphosa’s national address at 8pm on Sunday.

Ramaphosa is expected to announce new measures to deal with the rising infections of Covid-19 in the country, after a meeting of the National Joint Operational and Intelligence Structure (NatJoints).

The latest coronavirus infections appear to be dominated by the Delta variant that was first identified in India, scientists said on Saturday, as a third wave swept the country.

South Africa recorded 17 958 new Covid-19 infections on Saturday, as well as 157 deaths. Gauteng has the highest active cases with 78 359, followed by 15 612 cases in the Western Cape.

On Friday, the country recorded more than 18 000 new infections, with 215 deaths.

Acting Health Minister Mmamoloko Kubayi-Ngubane on Saturday warned that the new Delta variant was more transmissible and was spreading faster than previous variants.

IOL

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