The Durban University of Technology has produced and donating 3D printed face shields to selected communities in Durban. 
Picture: AP Photo/David J. Phillip
The Durban University of Technology has produced and donating 3D printed face shields to selected communities in Durban. Picture: AP Photo/David J. Phillip

Covid-19: DUT donates 3D printed face shields to protect frontline workers

By Staff Writer Time of article published Apr 15, 2020

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Durban - The Durban University of Technology has produced and donated 3D printed face shields to communities in Durban. 

Some of these face shields have already been donated to Prince Mshiyeni Hospital, to various doctors around Durban, to the Berea SAPS and Aryan Benovelent Old Age Home in Chatsworth.

"The 3D printed face shields are produced at the University’s Luban Workshop, situated at Ritson Campus in Durban. Using the 3D printing laboratory which has 12 high quality 3D printers, DUT saw a need to extend its hand to the Durban community during the global Covid-19 pandemic. In addition to the 12, 3D printers, DUT has two industrial Resin printers that could be used to print moulds to support large scale manufacturing processes," explained DUT's Alan Khan.

Khan said the concept of 3D printing refers to a process of additive manufacturing of three-dimensional real-world objects from a digital file. The process allows for the production of complex solid shapes using less material than the traditional manufacturing methods. 

"Industries worldwide have proposed the application of 3D printing to curtail the pervasive outbreak of Covid-19 through massive production of equipment such as face shields, oxygen connectors, oxygen splitters, Venturi valves, masks, gowns and respirators," he said.  

It only takes 24 minutes for each shield to be printed. 

The shield protects the eyes, nose and the mouth which are known to be the main areas which the virus can enter a person.

The Mercury

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