On Friday, National Health Minister Dr Zweli Mkhize, announced that the cumulative total of confirmed cases in SA now stood at 250 684, an increase of 12 348 in the last 24 hours. 
Picture: IANS
On Friday, National Health Minister Dr Zweli Mkhize, announced that the cumulative total of confirmed cases in SA now stood at 250 684, an increase of 12 348 in the last 24 hours. Picture: IANS

Over 250 000 South Africans have tested positive for Covid-19

By IOL Reporter Time of article published Jul 10, 2020

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Durban - Over 250 000 South Africans have tested positive for Covid-19.

On Friday, National Health Minister Dr Zweli Mkhize, announced that the cumulative total of confirmed cases in SA now stood at 250 684, an increase of 12 348 in the last 24 hours. 


The number of people who have died from Covid-19-related deaths has also increased to 3 860.

"Regrettably, a further 140 people have died. Eleven from KwaZulu-Natal, 24 from the Eastern Cape, 39 from Gauteng and 66 from the Western Cape," he said.

The number of recoveries is 118 232, which translates to a recovery rate of 47,2% .The total number of tests conducted to date is 2 057 232 with 56 663 new tests conducted since the last report. 

As the country's numbers continue to increase, people are urged to continue taking the necessary precautions to keep safe, this includes social distancing, wearing a cloth mask and using a hand sanitiser.  


Gauteng now contributes for 47% of South Africa’s current active cases, with the province totaling just under 55 000 active cases. Soweto - the country’s biggest township - has the most Covid-19 deaths in the province and also has the most active cases in the province. 

Meanwhile, according to chairperson of the South Africa's Ministerial Advisory Committee Professor Salim Abdool Karim, believes South Africans need to learn to live with coronavirus.

Karim explained that of all people who get Covid-19, half will be asymptomatic while of the remaining half, 1 in 5 people will need some kind of medical care while some will need to be hospitalised and somewhere between 1 and 2% of patients will succumb.  

IOL

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