Children gather on the battlefield before receiving their daily meal. Picture source: Lucinda Evans/Supplied
Children gather on the battlefield before receiving their daily meal. Picture source: Lucinda Evans/Supplied

PICS: Lucinda Evans helps feed over 1 000 Cape Flats children daily

By Robin-Lee Francke Time of article published Apr 17, 2020

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Cape Town – A Cape Flats community activist has taken it upon herself to feed more than 1,000 children daily.

Lucinda Evans has proven to be a rose among the thorns as she helps to feed 1,300 children daily in the Lavender Hill, Hillview

and Retreat communities in Cape Town.

There are six distributions points, the most

popular being a field in the heart of Lavender Hill known as the

battlefield. The battlefield is notorious for being the place where gangsters engage in horrific gang fights.

Lucinda says when the nationwide coronavirus lockdown was announced, no

one ever spoke about plans for the Cape Flats.

“When this (lockdown) happened no one came up with a plan

for the Cape Flats. No one came to speak to me. My narrative is for the

children, and with Covid-19 being the virus it is, it affects the immune system and these children’s immune systems need to be intact,” Lucinda says.

Lucinda works with a group of volunteers who join her as she goes

around to each distribution point to speak and pray for the children. Local songwriter and musician Claire Phillips is one of the volunteers.

Far right: local musician and songwriter Claire Phillips enjoys working with children

Source: Lucinda Evans

Far Left: Musician and songwriter Claire Phillips has fun while volunteering

Source: Lucinda Evans

“We have points in Lavender Hill, Cuba Heights, Hillview,

Retreat, Cafda, but we’re also supporting community workers, Warda Cay in Eastridge,

Mitchells Plain, Latifah Jacobs in Kuils River and a project in Caledon.

“We have a managing partnership with Breadline Africa and

the Newlands Rotary Club but we did not budget for the extension of the

lockdown.

“The budget was for 1,500 people, but lines are growing by a minimum of 50 people daily and I don’t have the budget for that.

“Thus, I am appealing to anyone who wants to donate to

please do so,” Lucinda says.

Lucinda is also the founder of a non-profit organisation called Philisa Abafazi Bethu, which assists abused women and children. The organisation

also offers an after-school programme to keep children off the streets and out of the clutches of gangs. In addition to that, it runs a seniors' programme.

Lucinda basks in apples that was donated for the feeding programme

Source: Lucinda Evans

Lucinda Evans speaking softly to a little boy from Lavender Hill

Source: Lucinda Evans

Local community heroes have praised Lucinda for her efforts

in assisting them.

Leeann, 31, and her husband, evangelist Bradley Solomons, 35,

from Hillview have been serving and ministering to the homeless and less

fortunate since 2017.

“We have been feeding our community in our area from our own

pockets, but due to the gang war we could not get out of the house.

“The gang war curbed us of feeding 500 to 700 people and it

was tough,” says Solomons.

He says he then asked the Lord to send someone on his path

who could assist.

“I asked God to send people on my road who could issue food

to people in my community.

“That’s where Lucinda and Philisa Abafazi Bethu stepped in.

Thanks to the donations and determination by Lucinda, we managed to feed 300 to

350 people, young and old, every day.

“The Bible says to give to someone in need is to lend to

God. We are not doing this for blessings but for those outside as we know what it’s

like to not have,” says Solomons.

As crowds of children line up with their empty containers in

hand, they keep to regulation and maintain a physical distance from each other.

Evangelist Bradley Solomons and his wife Leeann from Hillview. Source: Lucinda Evans

Lucinda Evans has been assisting Leeann Solomons and her husband feed about 350 people daily

Source: Lucinda Evans

As soon as Lucinda approaches, the faces of the children

light up. Smiling from ear to ear, they shout: "Aunty Lucinda, I am here. Look at me. Thank you, Aunty.”

Before every meal is handed out, a prayer with all

volunteers and recipients of the meal is said in unison.

Lucinda says they’ve experienced resistance from people but

will not let that deter them.

“We have received resistance for our programme, but we will

not stop.

“If they’re going to give us money, thank you very much.

But, if not, they need to step aside and let us continue,” she adds.

In October last year, Lucinda made the BBC’s Top 100 Women

list. The list included phenomenal women from across the world who are breaking

barriers in fields such as sports, science, activism and business.

She was also nominated for the position of the Western

Cape’s first child commissioner.

African News Agency (ANA)

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