Picture: Twitter/@SAPoliceService

Cape Town - The Western Cape Education Department said there are plans in place to move learners affected by the violent protests in Vredenburg to a safer location but expressed grave concern as violent protests continue. 

"While we can move learners to a safer location, and we have plans in place should we need to, if buses cannot get in or out of the areas in which the learners reside they will not be able to get to any venue,"  said Western Cape Education Department (WCED) spokesperson Jessica Shelver.

A service delivery protest turned violent in the Cape West Coast town on Tuesday in Ongegund, the broader informal settlement. 

According to police, protesters started to throw stones at Vredenburg Police Station and damaged 11 SAPS vehicles, several private vehicles and shops. Thirty-eight people were arrested for public violence.     

The protests continued on Wednesday with police and other Law Enforcement Agencies continuing to monitor the situation. 

According to the Saldanha Municipality, "the situation is still tense in the George Kerridge and Hopland area with incidents of the burning of tyres". 

The municipality said that all roads in Vredenburg were open, including main roads leading into the town.

Shelver said: "The principal of Louwville High School had to cancel the Grade 8 – 11 exams today due to violent protest action. Fortunately, the Grade 12 learners were able to write their NSC Afrikaans Paper.

"We are however concerned for the Grade 12 learners who will be writing Xhosa Paper 2 tomorrow as we are informed that many of the NSC candidates reside in the area that is experiencing the most violence."

Louwville High School has over 100 learners writing Xhosa.

"We urge the community to be cognisant of the fact the Grade 12s are writing exams and that should they not be able to write, the next opportunity they will have will be in May/ June next year which will have a massive impact on their future study plans."

IOL