Chasing down a cricket total is a lot like saving for an outcome, says Rowan Burger, the head of client strategy at Momentum Investments. Supplied
Chasing down a cricket total is a lot like saving for an outcome, says Rowan Burger, the head of client strategy at Momentum Investments.

You need a good balance of chasing runs (returns) to offset losing wickets (risks). In the T20 format you have a different approach, chasing down 200 runs versus 350 runs in a 50-overs match.

When chasing a lower total, you have the option of pacing yourself by just knocking around the ball for ones and twos and an occasional four here and there. Basically, you take fewer risks. But when you chase a large target, such as 350 runs, you are forced to take riskier shots to reach it.

This is similar to investments. While all investments carry some sort of risk, whether economic downturns, inflation or other factors, the higher the investment risk, the larger the potential return on investment. Outcomes-based investing (OBI) is about maximising the chances of your achieving your investment goals in spite of volatile markets and inflation.

Saving towards a set outcome is similar to being the team who bat second (chasing). Unlike the team who bat first (conventional investing) and who have a score in mind (but who can live with not reaching or exceeding it), they already know what they have to do to get to their goal in that set timeframe. They also know how to pace themselves or when they just have to go for it, keeping in mind factors that would influence the game.

Conventional investment strategies often focus solely on returns or to outperform a group of competitors.

And just like an ODI fan will stay glued to the screen throughout the World Cup, so should the OBI investor stay the course and stay invested throughout the term to achieve the desired outcome. 

Supplied by Momentum Investments