Dr Cecil Moss was a Springbok player, coach and team manager.

SA Rugby president Mark Alexander on Monday expressed his condolences to the family and friends of Dr Cecil Moss, who sadly passed away on Friday at the age of 92.

Dr Moss, who was an anaesthetist by profession, played in four Tests for the Springboks in 1949 – he was the vice-captain in the 4-0 series victory over the All Blacks that year – and also coached South Africa to nine victories in 10 Tests between 1984 and 1989.

“Doc Moss was a big name in the history of South African rugby, but he also left his mark in his professional career, most notably as the anaesthetist during the first heart transplant in 1967,” said Alexander.

“When it comes to coaching and being a selector, very few had the experience of Doc Moss. His rugby knowledge was legendary, but despite this, he was a humble and quiet man, and someone who will be dearly missed by those closest to him, as well as the many rugby players who had the privilege to work with him.

“Our thoughts and prayers are with his wife, children, grandchildren, other family and friends during this time of grief.” 

Dr Cecil Moss was born in Riversdale on 12 February 1925. He died on 27 October 2017, survived by his wife of 67 years, Jill, their son Jaime, their daughter Tessa and grandchildren.

SA Rugby