Constuction workers stand by Real Madrid's Santiago Bernabeu stadium in Madrid, Spain, Thursday, April 16, 2020. The Covid-19 coronavirus pandemic has affected more than games and player salaries for Real Madrid and Barcelona. It has also taken a toll on their stadium renovation plans. Both Spanish soccer clubs are working on hefty renovation projects for their famed venues. Photo: AP Photo/Paul White
Constuction workers stand by Real Madrid's Santiago Bernabeu stadium in Madrid, Spain, Thursday, April 16, 2020. The Covid-19 coronavirus pandemic has affected more than games and player salaries for Real Madrid and Barcelona. It has also taken a toll on their stadium renovation plans. Both Spanish soccer clubs are working on hefty renovation projects for their famed venues. Photo: AP Photo/Paul White

Spanish Sports minister upbeat but can't put date on La Liga return

By DPA Time of article published May 1, 2020

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BARCELONA – Spanish Sports Council (CSD) president Irene Lozano said she could not give a date when La Liga will be able to restart but said a return to training from Monday onwards was a positive sign.

Speaking in a video conference on Friday to Diario AS, Lozano said: "I am not in a position, not even close, to say when the first game will be played but it is great news in the European context that we can give a date for the return to training."

The head of the CSD, in effect the Spanish government's department for sport, thanked the collaboration between the Spanish league and the Spanish Football Federation adding: "In other European countries the lack of agreement between federations and clubs is hindering the return."

In a statement on Thursday CSD had confirmed that diagnostic tests for the detection of COVID-19 could be used by clubs.

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But on Friday, Lozano suggested this did not necessarily mean blanket tests for all players.

Testing of footballers has caused controversy in Spain with critics - including some players - arguing tests should first be made available to health workers.

"The protocol includes carrying out tests when medically prescribed," Lozano said. "Club doctors will be responsible. This is the way things are being done in other companies."

She did, however, add the caveat: "We also know that the average age of the first and second division players is 27 years and that in this age group the virus often displays no symptoms."

DPA

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