Gavin Watson.
The family of African Global Operations (formerly Bosasa) boss Gavin Watson are leaving no stone unturned in their quest to unravel his mysterious death.

The family is not ruling out foul play in the fatal car crash and have hired an accident-reconstruction expert to help them pin together the pieces leading to his death early on Monday near OR Tambo International Airport.

Forensic consultant Paul O’Sullivan said to establish if there was any “foul play” various scenarios had to be ventilated. A thorough forensic investigation could get to the bottom of the mystery.

O’Sullivan said these scenarios included confirming that the body retrieved from the mangled wreckage of the Toyota Corolla was that of Watson.

He said although the scenario might seem far-fetched, it cannot be ruled out.

The other is answering the question of whether Watson committed suicide, was killed or died in the accident.

“In this matter, the best way forward is to register an inquest docket and carry out a proper investigation,” O’Sullivan said.

Then there would be establishing the reason why he was going to the airport at that particular time.

“Find out why he was in a Toyota Corolla and not his own high-end vehicle.

"The latter would give him a better chance of surviving in a head-on collision with solid concrete. Establish if he was there or in that vicinity before,” he suggested.

O’Sullivan said that a post-mortem would also then determine the cause of death.

“Obviously, if he died of a heart attack, then the rest is a waste of time. But it’s not easy to smash a car into what is one of the few exposed concrete pillars in Joburg. Toxicology tests would also determine levels of alcohol or drugs,” he pointed out.

Furthermore, O’Sullivan said that most freeway pillars such as those where the deadly crash occurred are impossible to drive into.

The private investigator hired by the Watson family, Konrad Lotter, said that he had more than two decades’ experience investigating such incidents.

“I have been doing this type of investigation for about 26 years,” Lotter said.

He pointed out that he had probed numerous accidents with many questions regarding the crash. He highlighted that all cases differ, and all have distinctive features.

“Work has already begun, but the investigation is only at the beginning,” Lotter added.

Du Metier, the forensic engineering company where Lotter works as a consultant, said any information they get would remain confidential.