Crawford Sandton matric learner, Joshua Daniel Jankelow obtained distinctions in accounting, business studies, English, history, information technology, Zulu, life orientation, maths, physical science, AP maths with an overall average of 93.85%.   Picture: Itumeleng English African News Agency (ANA)
Crawford Sandton matric learner, Joshua Daniel Jankelow obtained distinctions in accounting, business studies, English, history, information technology, Zulu, life orientation, maths, physical science, AP maths with an overall average of 93.85%. Picture: Itumeleng English African News Agency (ANA)

Matric Results 2019: A perfect 10 for two whizz-kids

By Chulumanco Mahamba and Lungile Matsuma Time of article published Jan 7, 2020

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The balancing act was quite a breeze for two whizz-kids who scored 10 distinctions each.

Joshua Daniel Jankelow from Crawford College in Sandton told The Star that his matric year had been fulfilling and that he got through it by embracing the journey.

The 10 distinctions Jankelow obtained were in accounting, business studies, English, history, information technology (IT), Zulu, life orientation, maths, physical science, advanced programme maths - with an overall average of 93.85%.

The 18-year-old said that the whole notion of matric was difficult in general but because of their future plans they faced even more pressure.

“It is unfortunate what a great burden society has placed on our matrics. Overcoming that narrative and focusing on your own abilities rather than what people think you're going to do was an important process for me in order to do better in matric,” he added.

The star learner was a member of the South African national debating team for two years and competed in the world school debating championship which saw him going to Croatia and Thailand.

“It is always exciting to represent the country overseas,” he said.

Jankelow said that he had applied to a number of universities overseas, where he had intended to study a degree with majors in economics and finance and a minor in political science.

His advice to future matrics was to enjoy the journey, make the most of the year and to interrogate their own values.

“Sometimes there will be a moment of doubt, dread and of darkness but you are strong enough to overcome that,” he said.

BRESCIA House school learner Heather Wimberley obtained distinctions in accounting, AP maths, English, information technology, Zulu, life orientation, maths, music, Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music (ABRSM) music and physical science. Picture: Itumeleng English African News Agency (ANA)

Another stellar learner who also obtained 10 distinctions was Heather Wimberley from the Brescia House in Bryanston.

The all-rounder was awarded full academic colours in Grade 11 and 12.

In her final results, she impressed with distinctions in accounting, advanced programme maths, English, information technology, isiZulu, life orientation, maths, music, Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music (ABRSM) music and physical science.

Wimberley made it into the top 1% of IEB matriculants in maths and ABRSM music.

Apart from her academic prowess, she was also awarded full colours in music, hockey and orienteering during her time at the school.

“I was able to manage my time. I would get home and get my work done.

"But I would also understand the work in class and get my homework done during class before I left,” said Wimberley.

Always the academic, she said the highlight of her matric year was the research task she did in life orientation regarding gender stereotypes in video games.

“I’ve always enjoyed playing video games and it was very interesting to look into gender stereotypes in the games and to see that video games are progressing to be less stereotypical in terms of female stereotypes but they are basically the same for male stereotypes,” she added.

Wimberley said that she was hoping to study a degree in mechatronic engineering at the University of Cape Town.

“I would like to use that degree to get into some sort of robotics development or something like that,” she said.

The outstanding learner said that as she stepped into a new phase of her life as an adult at university, she was looking forward to be able to meet new and like-minded people that she could have interesting conversations with.

@Chulu_M @Lungile_TM

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