With virtual reality, there is no noise or other distractions. The learner is actively involved in the learning experience, says an expert.
With virtual reality, there is no noise or other distractions. The learner is actively involved in the learning experience, says an expert.
With virtual reality, there is no noise or other distractions. The learner is actively involved in the learning experience, says an expert.
With virtual reality, there is no noise or other distractions. The learner is actively involved in the learning experience, says an expert.
With virtual reality, there is no noise or other distractions. The learner is actively involved in the learning experience, says an expert.
With virtual reality, there is no noise or other distractions. The learner is actively involved in the learning experience, says an expert.
Virtual Reality (VR) learning is set to improve maths and science results in South African schools. The new way of teaching and learning through VR will help to close the gap between knowledge and understanding. This is according to Veative representative Susanna Ackerman.

Speaking to The Star, Ackerman said VR was about the learning experience.

“Research shows that if learners are actively involved, engaged in the learning process, they remember content for a longer time. It is easier to see because it is visuals,” she said.

Ackerman said integrating technology into maths and science learning is vital.

“It is extremely important because it gives learners an exiting experience. If you think about your education, you hardly remember anything. When using virtual reality, there is no noise, no distraction. If you put the device on, you are in that world. You are actively involved in the learning experience. The aim is to enhance teaching and learning,” said Ackerman.

VR has been introduced in selected schools across the country. One of the schools is Boitumelong Secondary School in Tembisa.

Department of Basic Education spokesperson Elijah Mhlanga said educators needed to adapt to new ways of teaching.

“We as educators need to develop an attitude of ‘lifelong learning’, allowing us to constantly adapt and adopt innovations within our classrooms and teaching practices.

“It is imperative for us as a country to facilitate and support these developments as effectively as possible,” Mhlanga said.

The Western Cape and KwaZulu-Natal provincial governments are in talks to pilot the introduction of VR learning solutions in selected government schools.

On June 15 and 16, Spintelligent, in partnership with the Department of Basic Education and other sponsors, is hosting EduWeek Africa at the TicketPro Dome in Joburg. Veative will have VR exhibition on display.