Czech-born local parish priest Wacław Tomaszek founded the chapel in 1776. Picture: Foreigners in Poland.

Skull Chapel in Poland may seem like an ordinary chapel, but upon closer inspection, this iconic site has over 3000 skulls that decorates the inside.

The Skull Chapel is an ossuary chapel located in the Czermna district of Kudowa, a town in Lower Silesia, Poland that was built in the 18th century.

 Serving as a reminder of all those who died during the Thirty Years’ War (1618–1648), three Silesian Wars (1740–1763), and those who lost their lives to cholera epidemics, plague, syphilis and hunger, the chapel makes up the six in Europe showcasing skeletal remains.

Czech-born local parish priest Wacław Tomaszek founded the chapel in 1776. According to past stories, Tomaszek together with J. Schmidt and grave digger J. Langer collected the casualties’ bones, cleaned and put them in the chapel within an 18 year period,from 1776 to 1794.

 Today,  the skulls of people who built the chapel, including father Tomaszek, are placed in the center of the building and on the altar in 1804. Inside are a crucifix and two carvings of angels, one with a Latin inscription that reads "Arise from the Dead". A recording inside the church available in three languages (Polish, Czech and German) explains the history of the Chapel.