The new Australian visa quotas is set to be revealed in October. Picture: Supplied.
The new Australian visa quotas is set to be revealed in October. Picture: Supplied.

Australian visa quotas change: Here's what you need to know

By Travel Reporter Time of article published Sep 4, 2020

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South Africans planning to migrate to Australia on any state nominated visa, should have everything ready for their application to be processed by October 6, 2020, when the new quotas are announced and distributed to the state governments.

The purpose of State Nominated Visas is to allow states and territories to invite those with skills and occupations that are currently in demand in their areas to address skills shortages.

The visas that fall under the state nominated programme include Business and Innovation visa, Investment Visa, Skilled Nominated visa and Skilled Work Regional (Provisional) visa.

Traditionally, the Australian government announces its quotas for the Skilled Migration programme at the start of the financial year on July 1 alongside its annual budget.

This sets out how many permanent Australian visas it expects to issue for the year. Each state government is allocated a number of visas for skilled applicants as part of the State and Territory nomination programme.

However, due to Covid-19, this year’s Federal budget and new quotas allocations have been postponed to October.

Australian migration agent for Sable International Sam Hopwood says that it is unclear whether current migration planning levels will be maintained or whether state governments will receive a higher or lower quota than usual.

“There is a real risk that in the wake of Covid, the quotas will be reduced to give Australian citizens preference, in a scarcer job market,” says Hopwood.

He says South Africans need to complete their skills assessment, get all their documentation in order, take the English language test, gain more experience in their nominated occupation, and thoroughly research state government specific criteria before they apply.

“It is anticipated that state governments are going to be overwhelmed with new applications when the programme resumes and they will be able to cherry pick the best of the best. So South Africans should get in early and be well prepared so that when you submit your application you have a higher chance of being selected,” adds Hopwood.

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