Guests watch a show near a statue of Walt Disney and Micky Mouse in front of the Cinderella Castle at the Magic Kingdom at Walt Disney World in Lake Buena Vista, part of the Orlando area in January. Picture: AP Photo/John Raoux.
Guests watch a show near a statue of Walt Disney and Micky Mouse in front of the Cinderella Castle at the Magic Kingdom at Walt Disney World in Lake Buena Vista, part of the Orlando area in January. Picture: AP Photo/John Raoux.

A new way of experiencing Disney World is coming. Here are the new changes

By AP/Washington Post Time of article published Jun 6, 2020

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When Walt Disney World reopens next month for the first time since it closed due to the spread of the new coronavirus, there will be no parades, fireworks shows nor “meet-and-greet” sessions with performers dressed as Disney characters.

Union official Eric Clinton told members this week that Disney employees won’t even be allowed to take photos of visitors using the guests’ cellphones to cut back on the risk of spreading the virus.

“Any scenario that could create large crowds ... the company isn’t going to do it,” said Clinton, president of Unite Here Local 362.

Disney has not made any plans to reopen Disney World’s water parks, and those workers can transfer temporarily into other areas. College students and international workers who staffed the country pavilions at Epcot’s World Showcase aren’t coming back anytime soon, so the positions formally staffed by international workers will be worked by US employees, Clinton said.

Thousands of Disney World workers will be recalled for work starting in mid-June, ahead of the resort’s opening next month.

Meanwhile, The Washington Post revealed that Shanghai Disneyland started welcoming visitors back last month after being closed since late January. The park opened with limited attendance, temperature checks, mask rules and other health requirements; an adjacent hotel and shopping area had already reopened in March.

During an earnings call this month, Walt Disney Co. chief executive Bob Chapek said the company could use similar measures at other locations around the world.

"While it's too early to predict when we'll be able to begin resuming all our operations, we are evaluating a number of different scenarios to ensure a cautious, sensible and deliberate approach to the eventual reopening of our parks," Chapek said. 

Source: Associated Press/Washington Post

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