DJ Euphonik has won a court battle against his former agency which locked him out of his Facebook page.
There seems to be no end in sight yet in the spat between DJ Euphonik and his former agency, Celebrity Services Africa (CSA).

The popular musician squared off with CSA in the Western Cape High Court last week after the agency removed him as co-administrator of his page and unpublished it - cutting him off from his 600000 followers.

This week, Acting High Court Judge Bruce Langa ordered CSA to restore Euphonik’s access and administrative rights to the Facebook page, “Euphonik DJ”, republish the Facebook page and restore all accessibility as before March 25, 2018.

CSA was also ordered to restore any deleted content and was restrained from removing or interfering with Euphonik’s access and administrative rights or unpublishing the Facebook page.

The drama started in march this year while Euphonik was in the US and could not access his page.

Things went pear-shaped for Euphonik and CSA in April 2017 in what has been described in court papers as “a breakdown in the business relationship due to various failures by the respondent to comply with its obligations” and the agreement was terminated on June 5, 2017.

Euphonik has been trying to regain possession of his Facebook page since April 26, 2017.

The lawyer for CSA, Charl Coetzee, told Weekend Argus last week that Euphonik owed the agency R12million and that there was a breach of agreement which set off the deactivation of the Facebook page.

Coetzee also claimed that Euphonik owed the company for work done on the Facebook page.

CSA also brought the issue of a lien - the right to keep possession of property belonging to another person until a debt owed by that person is discharged - before the court but the judge dealt only with the matter of the Facebook page.

Euphonik’s attorney, Lee Binnemanm said that in Judge Langa’s ruling this week, he noted the lien which CSA was exercising over the Facebook page could not succeed in law.

“We are pleased with the judgment handed down and the order granted, effectively confirming the unlawfulness of the CSA’s actions. Unfortunately, this does not appear to be the end as CSA have indicated their intention to appeal. We are of the view that the judgment will and should stand and will make the necessary submissions to court in due course,” said Binneman.

Coetzee said he had filed an application for leave to appeal on Thursday.