Cape Town. Trucks were used to transport the whale cauceses to Vissershok Landfill site. Picture Henk Kruger/African News Agency (ANA)
Cape Town. Trucks were used to transport the whale cauceses to Vissershok Landfill site. Picture Henk Kruger/African News Agency (ANA)

What happens to animals that die on the roads

By Shanice Naidoo Time of article published Jan 23, 2021

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Cape Town - Ever wonder what happens to pets that are seen dead on roads or in public spaces?

They are picked up by the City’s Solid Waste Department, which oversees the removal of animal carcasses on public land and roads.

Mayco member for Waste and Water Xanthea Limberg said carcasses are normally taken to the Vissershok landfill site.

Asked if the department checks if the animal is microchipped, she said that the current tender to remove animal carcasses on public land and roads did not make provision for such requests.

Spokesperson for the City Traffic Service, Kevin Jacobs, said every motor vehicle accident, including the running over of an animal, should be reported to the SAPS.

“Accidents with animals must be viewed from a humane perspective, nobody should leave an animal in distress in the roadway. Motorists can call Traffic Services or SAPS for assistance at a scene. The SPCA responds to assist us with animals in distress. We will arrange with the SPCA for medical treatment for the animal, or in worst-case scenarios, the removal of the carcass. It’s often difficult to locate the owner of the animal. Reporting the incident to SAPS is deemed to be sufficient in the absence of the owner,” said Jacobs.

Cape Of Good Hope SPCA spokesperson Belinda Abraham said: “The SPCA definitely scans all animals that either die on scene of a rescue or die in transit to the SPCA. Unfortunately, we don’t have the resources to respond to deceased animals or animals that have already passed away on the roads, this responsibility lies with the City cleansing.”

She encouraged those who picked up a potentially injured animal to take it directly to the closest vet so that they could scan there for a microchip, or if they find a dead animal and if they feel comfortable doing so, to hand in at the nearest vet.

“We remind pet owners everywhere to keep their pets secure within the perimeters of their property. We understand that accidents do happen and animals do get out, in which case it would be best not only to have them microchipped but to also have a collar and tag, which would help identify the animal without a scanner being present, and the finder would be able to contact the owner,” said Abraham.

Weekend Argus

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