KwaZulu-Natal police spokesperson, Captain Nqobile Gwala, said it was alleged that on Tuesday four armed men entered the business premises in Tongaat.
Picture: Supplied
KwaZulu-Natal police spokesperson, Captain Nqobile Gwala, said it was alleged that on Tuesday four armed men entered the business premises in Tongaat. Picture: Supplied

Alcohol, panic button stolen in Tongaat business robbery

By Anelisa Khubeka Time of article published May 7, 2020

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Durban - Police are investigating an armed robbery at a hotel where the robbers also stole a panic button.

KwaZulu-Natal police spokesperson, Captain Nqobile Gwala, said it was alleged that on Tuesday four armed men entered the business premises in Tongaat.

"They robbed the security guard of his cellphone and proceeded into the business premises. They broke into the premises and took assorted liquor, panic button and two gate keys before fleeing the scene in their getaway vehicle. The matter is still under investigation," she said.

Gwala said police were investigating further. 

On Wednesday the Institute for Security Studies (ISS) said  evidence shows that random police patrols, rapid response to calls for service and reactive investigation have limited impact in reducing crime.

"Police get much better results from being proactive and fair, from targeting specific people, places and behaviours, and when they tackle specific problems," said the Institute's Andrew Faull.

He said South Africa’s police could learn from the medical response to the Covid-19 outbreak.

"Policing policy, tactics and decisions – and South Africa’s overall response to crime and violence – should be based on the best evidence for what works to reduce harm and promote trust in the police," he said.

Faull said responsible medical practitioners and governments make decisions based on evidence.

He said they scrutinise the best available data and research to determine what is most likely to work to achieve desired outcomes.

"Policing that is primarily guided by evidence for what works in reducing crime and building trust, or which is carefully planned and evaluated when introducing new practices, is more likely to produce the desired results," said Faull.

Daily News

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