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Wednesday, August 17, 2022

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Animals not spared from the wrath of heavy rains and flooding in KZN

Kloof and Highway SPCA Inspector Petros Simamane with some of the puppies that were handed over to the SPCA by a family who had lost everything. | Facebook/Kloof and Highway SPCA

Kloof and Highway SPCA Inspector Petros Simamane with some of the puppies that were handed over to the SPCA by a family who had lost everything. | Facebook/Kloof and Highway SPCA

Published Apr 18, 2022

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Durban - Animals have also been affected by recent heavy rains and flooding in KwaZulu-Natal.

SAPS K9 Leah drowned in the line of duty on Sunday while searching for missing persons.

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Amanzimtoti SAPS K9s had to be rescued by boat from their kennels last week due to rising flood levels.

A litter of puppies were handed over to the Kloof and Highway SPCA by a family who had lost everything. | Facebook/Kloof and Highway SPCA

The National Council of SPCAs (NSPCA) said: “Disasters favour nobody. Not people, and certainly not animals either. The NSPCA has been in liaison with all fourteen of our member SPCAs across KZN to try and establish a means of providing assistance.”

“Many animals have already been and will continue to be displaced. When faced with the flooding, all alone, these animals will not know where to go, where to find shelter, water and food. The SPCA movement, other animal welfare organisations and the public need to be the light for these animals.”

A litter of puppies were handed over to the Kloof and Highway SPCA by a family who had lost everything. | Facebook/Kloof and Highway SPCA

The NSPCA urged the public to report any animals that are injured, sick or compromised as a result of the flooding to their local SPCAs. If you come across an animal that has been lost or is displaced, or is stranded, try to lend a helping hand. The SPCA is open 24/7 to admit animals into their care.

It said it had a team of inspectors on standby and has assured its member SPCAs that they will assist should they require it.

“The aftermath of this disaster will be long-term. SPCAs will have to be able to cope with the influx of animals that are brought in, as well as make provisions to go out into surrounding communities to assist the people with animals who have also been affected by the flooding,” the NSPCA said.

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The Springfield SPCA was left flooded after the Umgeni River overflowed. | Facebook/SPCA Durban

On Wednesday, Kloof and Highway SPCA inspector Petros Simamane found a family who had lost everything and had a litter of puppies.

“They immediately handed them over to our care, knowing they could not look after them. These puppies will spend the night in a warm bed with a full tummy. Our inspectorate team gave food, water and blankets to many families with pets, and where necessary, they helped build some shelters and secure the properties for their animals,” the Kloof and Highway SPCA said.

On Tuesday, SPCA Durban said severe flooding at their Springfield SPCA due to the overflow of the Umgeni River resulted in emergency rescues performed by emergency staff at 2am on Tuesday. Animals were moved from flooded kennels to safe, dry kennels. Thanks to these brave staff members, no animals were harmed.

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