Captain Neville Eva, right, died in 2012. He is seen here with colleagues Johnny Smith and Shane Naidoo.
Captain Neville Eva, right, died in 2012. He is seen here with colleagues Johnny Smith and Shane Naidoo.
Captain Neville Eva died in 2012. Here his colleagues carry his coffin out the church. Picture: Zanele Zulu. ANA
Captain Neville Eva died in 2012. Here his colleagues carry his coffin out the church. Picture: Zanele Zulu. ANA

Durban - The sons of one of the so-called Cato Manor 'death squad' police officers have broken their silence following the Sunday Times apology over a series of stories its investigations unit wrote including one that alleged a police unit in Durban was running a death squad.

Ashton and Dale Eva, the son's of Captain Neville Eva - who died in 2012 without having the opportunity to clear his name -  have spoken about the heartache and their personal anger of seeing their father arrested and facing trial over allegations that he was part of the Cato Manor death squad.

Their open letter to the Sunday Times was originally published on the Facebook page of the supporters of the Durban Organised Crime Unit KZN.

This is the edited version of Ashton Eva's story.

OPEN LETTER It's been a long six year since the Sunday Times destroyed my dad's and his colleague's names with pictures and proclamations splattered all over the front page of the Sunday Times. 

On a personal level, my family and I will never forget that day the day that it seemed like the whole country turned its back on my dad who had dedicated his whole life to the police and thanks to them and the Sunday Times he is no longer with us.

As a family, it was very difficult as we didn't understand what went wrong why they were being compared to the Vlakplaas.

Why were they saying they were a hit squad??

But deep down, we always knew the truth - that he was innocent and that he and his colleagues were collateral damage for political and monetary gain for corrupt politicians, government officials and criminals and all because they were doing their jobs.

On the Friday Morning before the article was to be printed it was heartbreaking for me personally as he told us what was about to happen and it seemed that my dad felt like he had let us down, that he had failed to protect us.

He wore his heart on his sleeved and called all the people that meant something to him, he knew that the article was being printed and would be published for the country to see.

I will never forget that look in his eyes, the heartbreak that all his long hours of hard work, putting his life on the line as he faced the worst of society on a daily basis and all the sacrifice he had made were for nothing as his world came crashing down because the editors were chasing a prize and serving a hidden agenda.

Ashton Eva the son of one of the so-called Cato Manor 'death squad' police officers has broken his silence following the Sunday Times apology. Picture: Facebook


However I could see that he had a new fight he was about to take on a new breed of criminal the very same institution that employed him, and if you ask anyone that knew my dad he was never ever going to lose this fight he would fight tooth and nail and put in all the hours necessary as would never allow anyone to get the better of him especially if he was not in the wrong.

My dad had always had a very high code of moral ethics and he totally believed in our Justice system and the rule of law.

He told us there and then that the truth would come out in the end but it is going to be a very hard long road and that we must stand strong in the face of adversity.

We as a family will never give the satisfaction to the captured men of the Sunday Times.

We know the truth and we have never been ashamed - but rather proud of my Dads integrity and what he stood for which was everyone is entitled to justice and that every South African deserves to live in a country where they feel safe and not terrorized by criminals.

All my dad ever wanted - and said to me is "give us our day in court let them write whatever they want."

I challenge the captured men to put this all to bed and reveal your sources let the country see their names splattered all over the Sunday Times because the truth will truly set you free.

"Sorry" is never going to be enough.

Just how much blood is on your hands?

Remember this: You never just attacked 30 men, you attacked their families, their wives and their children.

We have been quiet for six years but I can promise you this: I will not allow the people that destroyed my father's name to think that by them saying a simple I am "sorry we got it wrong" is ever going to be good enough - it will NEVER be!

I am Ashton Eva. The son of a hero.

I will always stand tall and will never stop fighting until the courts finally decide to look at the facts/reality/truth and clear my father and members of the Cato Manor Unit's name.

I believe in the Justice of this land...


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