Leon Lestrade African News Agency (ANA)
DURBAN - Durban small business owner Nondumiso Mkhize got the idea for her unique offering while chatting with a client.

Mkhize said she used to rent a cubicle in a salon near Gateway. One day a client called to cancel a nail appointment, because she wanted to go to the beach instead.

“I then jokingly said I’ll come to the beach to do her nails there and we laughed about it. That’s how the beach massage idea was born. I had to do some research on the idea to see if it was viable. After consultations with certain people, I approached the eThekwini Municipal offices And the rest is history.”

Mkhize’s Nondz Beach Massage Experience specialises in beach massage, beauty treatments, nails and make-up and operates at uMhlanga’s main beach promenade.

The company also offers pamper party and picnic events where staff go to clients’ homes or offices.

Mkhize’s business was recently named one of Durban’s most loved local businesses in a survey conducted by Santam and East Coast Radio.

Mkhize said being named one of the city’s most loved businesses made her and her staff proud.

Holidaymakers flock to uMhlanga’s main beach all year, looking to relax and unwind. Recognising the needs of this niche market, a business is bringing pampering services to the clients on the beachfront.


“We would like to thank everyone who believes in and supports our craft. We are looking forward to having more business from the exposure that we have enjoyed from the competition.”

Mkhize said her strength as an entrepreneur was that she was driven by “passion, love and respect for my craft”.

She said most of her advertisements for her business are done on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter, but a lot of her clients also came from word of mouth.

“Social media plays a crucial role in marketing my business, as it reaches potential customers far and wide with just a click of a button.”

Mkhize said she experienced some challenges to get approval to set up her business on the beach promenade.

“As I’m not allowed to have a permanent structure like the kiosk near the Pier and Bronze Beach, on rainy or windy days I can’t open for business, which means a loss for me and for my customers.”

She added that she was hoping to get approval for a permanent or semi-permanent structure on the promenade.

“That will ensure that I am able to trade come rain or wind. I also want to grow my business and have branches on other beaches. I also want to share my skills and help as many young black females, especially from rural areas which is where I come from.”

THE MERCURY