A SAPS officer at Springfield in Umgeni road where looters stormed stores at a shopping centre in the area. | Motshwari Mofokeng African News Agency (ANA)
A SAPS officer at Springfield in Umgeni road where looters stormed stores at a shopping centre in the area. | Motshwari Mofokeng African News Agency (ANA)

KZN Christian Council weighs in on the unrest in the province

By Nonhlanhla Nozizwe Hlatshwayo Time of article published Jul 13, 2021

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DURBAN: IN light of the ongoing unrest in the province, the KwaZulu-Natal Christian Council (KZNCC) has called on the government to urgently reduce the glaring and immoral chasm between the rich and the poor.

The council met recently to evaluate the current situation and to discuss the latest Covid-19 regulations.

In a statement released after their meeting, the council condemned the public violence and looting.

“We state that this is totally unacceptable, and cannot under any circumstances be tolerated. We appreciate that people have different viewpoints and opinions on the socio-political issues of the day, and we therefore urgently call for dialogue and practical interventions from all parties and stakeholders rather than violence,” they stated.

The council also appealed to faith leaders to offer their support.

“As the church we have a key role to play in offering pastoral care, peace monitoring and peace-building at this time. Government, the faith and business sectors and civil society together have an urgent role to play in responding to those who are destitute and hungry; a situation which has only been amplified by the Covid-19 pandemic over the past 18 months. Poverty and dire hunger cannot be ignored and must be addressed immediately. Leaving these lived realities unaddressed is not only immoral but will also prepare fertile ground for unrest,” they stated.

The council expressed its disappointment regarding the level four lockdown regulations that prohibit church gatherings among other gatherings. It said the regulations were no longer sustainable and severely hampered the church’s financial sustainability as well as its ability to perform multiple roles in the lives of individuals and communities.

“We also note the contradiction between some churches operating as vaccination centres, serving hundreds of people, but then not being allowed to open as places of worship and other types of service to our communities,” the council stated.

THE MERCURY

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