A file picture of City of Tshwane workers demonstrating outside the municipal headquarters. Oupa Mokoena/African News Agency (ANA)
Pretoria - The City of Tshwane has allayed fears that municipal employees who previously worked under its defunct parastatal called Sandspruit Works Association won’t benefit from the payouts expected on February 24.

This concern was raised by the regional South African Municipal Workers' Union (Samwu) in an internal memo submitted to its affiliates.

The union said: “We have also been informed that there is an intention to isolate Sandspruit employees and Samwu will ensure that all employees benefit as per the collective agreement.”

City spokesperson Lindela Mashigo said it was untrue that workers would not benefit from the payments.

“I don’t think they will be marginalised. They will benefit like any other employees.”

The parastatal was dissolved during the tenure of then mayor Solly Msimanga in 2017 and its employees absorbed by City departments.

Mashigo said the City would cover lump sums for the period July 1 last year to December 31.

Union secretary Mpho Tladinyane said payouts were part of a collective agreement, which also included the adjustment of salary scales in line with a category 10 municipality Tshwane became in 2017.

Back then when the City was upgraded from category 9 to 10 by the Department of Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs, workers salaries were not adjusted accordingly.

In August workers staged a week-long strike to express their dissatisfaction over the pay dispute.

To end the strike, parties instituted an investigation to compare salary scales in Tshwane with other metros with a view to paying them as their counterparts were elsewhere in the country.

The report revealed salary disparities between workers in Tshwane and those in similar metros.

On Monday more than 100 Samwu shop stewards from different branches converged on Tshwane House to complain about delays to implementation of new salary scales.

They vowed to picket every day until Friday, a deadline for loading workers’ payments on SAP - the system used by the municipality to process salaries.

Despite their promise, they didn’t return to Tshwane House yesterday except Tladinyane who was assigned to monitor work by municipal workers to load payouts into the system.

Tladinyane said there would be a meeting tomorrow with City management to review work done so far to meet the payments deadline.

The Pretoria News understands an estimated R500 million would be spent by the City in paying lump sums to more than 20 000 of its employees.

Pretoria News