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Liquor traders reminded to help fight scourge of gender-based violence

President of the Concerned Tshwane Liquor Traders’ Association, Oupa Mthombeni, with some of the members who attended a GBV awareness event at Tieho Tavern, Hammanskraal. Picture: Jacques Naude/African News Agency (ANA)

President of the Concerned Tshwane Liquor Traders’ Association, Oupa Mthombeni, with some of the members who attended a GBV awareness event at Tieho Tavern, Hammanskraal. Picture: Jacques Naude/African News Agency (ANA)

Published May 18, 2022

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Pretoria - Liquor traders have been reminded to comply with the law and help fight the scourge of gender-based violence (GBV).

The message was echoed by the Concerned Tshwane Liquor Traders’ Association, which is on a road trip across Pretoria raising awareness about gender-based violence and its connection to alcohol.

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Yesterday, the organisation held the first campaign at Tieho Tavern in Danhouse, Hammanskraal.

Its president, Oupa Mthombeni, said gender-based violence was a serious issue in society, and alcohol always had a role in reported cases.

“As liquor traders, we have decided to step up and involve ourselves more in solving the issue of GBV.

“Looking at the statistics, you find that in 95% of cases that are reported, alcohol is involved, and the perpetrators are often under the influence of alcohol,” said Mthombeni.

He said they wanted to emphasise and remind liquor traders not to sell alcohol to known perpetrators or underage children.

“If a liquor trader or a seller is suspicious of someone’s age, they should ask for an ID to confirm if they are of the legal age to be sold alcohol.

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“If they fail to produce an ID, the trader should refuse to sell them alcohol,” he said.

If they found a liquor trader not complying with the law, Mthombeni said they would involve the police.

“We are working together with the police. If we find a trader not complying, we report them and they must be disciplined.”

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Tieho Tavern owner Mpho Ratshweonyane said she had been running the business for 42 years and she had always complied with the laws.

“Even before I was a member of the association, I always followed the rules.

“After joining it, Mthombeni taught us more about complying.”

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She said the tavern did not sell alcohol to children or known perpetrators of GBV, law officers in uniform or pregnant women.

Thami Mogomane, from the Department of Community and Safety, said GBV was a huge problem in many communities, and liquor traders had noticed that the abuse of alcohol contributed to the crime.

“I met the association last month where I gave a talk at one of their campaigns, and they asked for a partnership with the department to work towards a common goal of solving issues of GBV and preventing it as well as to rehabilitate perpetrators,” said Mogomane.

Pretoria News

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