Chief Khoisan SA. Picture: Rudzani Matshili
Chief Khoisan SA. Picture: Rudzani Matshili
The Khoisan tents at the Union Buildings. Picture: Rudzani Matshili
The Khoisan tents at the Union Buildings. Picture: Rudzani Matshili
RUDZANI MATSHILI

Despite the South African Weather Service’s warning of continuous rain possibly leading to a risk of flash flooding, the Khoisan trio will remain at the Union Buildings until their memorandum is delivered to the right person.
 
“We are going to stay here no matter what the weather conditions because on our journey here we actually walked 5km in hail so the rain is nothing to us,” Chief Khoisan SA said.
 
Shane Plaatjies, Brendon Billings and Chief Khoisan SA undertook a three week journey walking from Port Elizabeth to Pretoria to demand recognition of their culture and language.

Chief Khoisan SA speaks about their demands from government. Video: Rudzani Matshili


The Chief said: “our bodies sort of adapt to different weather conditions so when we walked and there was hail we didn’t feel anything and some of the cars you could see were dented but our bodies were still in fine condition,” he said.
 
He said they normally danced when there is lightning and rain.

“When there is lightning we normally do our dance called the “rain dance” and through that dance we basically command the creations.

Chief Khoisan SA speaks about their plight and demands from government. Video: Rudzani Matshili


"Things like the wind and the trees because we are the rainmakers so we can stop the rain if we want to.”

The Chief said their first demand was for the South African government to officially recognise the community as the first citizens of the country.

And secondly for the language, which was emblazoned on South Africa's coat of arms to finally be included as an official language.

He also said they wanted the 1913 Land Claims Act to be scrapped or amended, as it was holding them from owning land.