Roodebloem Road in Woodstock. Meeting the city council’s R50billion income target for the 2019/20, will come at a high cost for Cape Town’s ratepayer. Picture: Tracey Adams / African News Agency (ANA)
Cape Town - Meeting the city council’s R50billion income target for the 2019/20, will come at a high cost for Cape Town’s ratepayers as the council approved above inflation increases on its tariffs.

Sandra Dickson, from the ratepayers activist group Stop CoCT, said the city council had not responded to the plight of pensioners who made it very clear in their responses to the budget that they found it difficult to keep up with the rapidly increasing bills.

“The city also persists with the levies and has gone ahead with increasing the electricity levy from R150 to R162.50.

“Stop CoCT would have liked to see a more balanced budget where the ability for the public to pay the increased tariffs, is balanced with some relief for them in the form of scrapping the water and electricity levies and assisting pensioners to cope with the huge municipal bills they receive every month,” said Dickson.

Forum of Cape Flats Civics chairperson Lester September said: “There is very poor planning involved from the city and over the next few months unfortunately middle-class homeowners and income earners will have to carry this burden.”

Ian Neilson, mayoral committee member for finance said: “We have adjusted the rates rebates for property owners who are dependent on pensions or social grants. The upper limit on this rebate is lifted from R15000 to R17500 a month of household income. The rebates for all income bands between R4500 and R17500 a month are also adjusted upwards.”

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Cape Argus