Learners in the Manneberg area walk to school. Safety at schools around the country remains a concern after at least 13 confirmed cases of kidnapping took place since the 8th of August 2018.  Picture: Henk Kruger/ANA/African News Agency
Learners in the Manneberg area walk to school. Safety at schools around the country remains a concern after at least 13 confirmed cases of kidnapping took place since the 8th of August 2018. Picture: Henk Kruger/ANA/African News Agency

Crime prevention programme seeks to educate pupils about courts and prison

By Sisonke Mlamla Time of article published Apr 5, 2019

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Cape Town - Victims of school violence are to benefit from a crime prevention programme, and the trainees were to be rewarded with certificates at a Communities and Justice Programme at Mfuleni High School School on Thursday.

The programme, organised by the Safer South Africa Foundation (SSAF), was launched in 2013, and has since reached 36 schools in seven provinces, with 1862 learners involved.

SSAF Western Cape provincial co-ordinator Nomonde Scott said the aim of the certificate award ceremony was to recognise and show appreciation to 80 pupils who had successfully completed the programme.

Scott said they were in partnership with Kayamandi High School and Mfuleni High School, and were also in collaboration with the police, Correctional Services Department, traffic department, National Prosecuting Authority and South African Human Rights Commission.

“We want to educate the public about the criminal justice system, and encourage and support research to inform community-based crime prevention strategies.

“The SSAF introduced the Communities and Justice Programme to both of these schools to address and mitigate the negative behavioural challenges that were faced by the teachers and the community,” Scott said.

One of the pupils from Kayamandi High School, Olona Kalimashe 14, said that through the programme they were introduced to many things, including how the Department of Correctional Services and the courts work.

Teacher Nomonde Gxilishe from Kayamandi High School has applauded the programme.

“Some of the learners are part of criminal gangs and with the help of the programme it made a positive impact in our school,” Gxilishe said.

She said some pupils were on the verge of dropping out of school because of substance abuse.

SSAF chief executive officer Riah Phiyega said safety, security and community well-being were at the heart of each community.

“Children are citizens too. They should be prepared and empowered to be active citizens in ensuring that our precious country is safe and secure to live in,” Phiyega said.

“The SSAF exists to mobilise under-resourced communities to build awareness and ability to work together in the fight against crime.”

The foundation also seeks to actively contribute to the national discourse on crime and community safety matters by understanding research, advocacy and campaigns.

@SISONKE_MD

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Cape Argus

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