The City of Cape Town said on Monday said that it would continue to protect its customers as much as it could. Picture: Armand Hough/African News Agency (ANA)
The City of Cape Town said on Monday said that it would continue to protect its customers as much as it could. Picture: Armand Hough/African News Agency (ANA)

Here is how the City of Cape Town will handle this week’s load shedding

By Theolin Tembo Time of article published Oct 11, 2021

Share this article:

Cape Town - The City of Cape Town has made it a little easier for its customers to plan around the recent bout of load shedding after Eskom extended Stage 2 power cuts until Thursday.

Eskom had initially announced it would implement Stage 2 load shedding on Thursday, but then on Friday the power utility announced that in order to continue replenishing the emergency generation reserves and address additional risks it would continue Stage 2 of load shedding.

“During this time Eskom, will be working hard to return a number of generating units to service and we urge the public to continue using electricity sparingly.”

Eskom added that it would communicate promptly should there be any significant changes to the power system.

The City of Cape Town said on Monday that it would continue to protect its customers as much as it could.

City-supplied customers will be on Stage 1 load shedding from 6am until 10pm, then move back to Stage 2. Stage 2 load shedding is expected to continue from 10pm to 6am.

“This is broadly expected to be the routine until Thursday. Any changes or updates will be communicated as soon as possible.”

Christiaan Hattingh, AWPower’s managing director, has meanwhile said that given how load shedding is a reality that every South African business needs to manage, there are a wide range of affordable backup solutions on the market.

“Your backup power options can be divided into two main categories: battery backup or a generator. Generators are suited for industrial businesses or large companies that need to run power-intensive loads such as data centres, commercial refrigerators or production lines.

“Compared with generators, battery backup systems are quieter, less prone to breaking down, cleaner (no carbon monoxide fumes), and more affordable to run since they don’t depend on fuel,” Hattingh said.

“Initial investment required is more, but over time becomes the more affordable solution, especially if integrated with a solar system.”

Hattingh said that many businesses thus supplement their generators with more cost-effective battery back-up systems for lighter loads like office lighting, desktop computers and point of sale systems.

“Others only use their generator as a backup to their battery-based systems and those with lighter power needs may only need a battery-based solution.

“When it comes to battery back-up systems, there are many options on the market, catering to a range of budgets and energy needs. If you are looking for a long-term solution to ensure power during load shedding, a hybrid solar system is a good option to consider.”

Hattingh added: “Whether working from home or in the office, with load shedding seemingly here to stay, installing a battery backup solution is a no-brainer and a must-have for almost any business to ensure continuity and safeguard productivity.”

Cape Argus

Share this article: