The Western Cape Liquor Authority said it had suspended 42 licences, dismissed 10 applications, and two applications were pending over the past week. Photo: Ross Jansen/African News Agency (ANA) Archives
The Western Cape Liquor Authority said it had suspended 42 licences, dismissed 10 applications, and two applications were pending over the past week. Photo: Ross Jansen/African News Agency (ANA) Archives

Licences of 42 liquor traders suspended in the Western Cape

By Sisonke Mlamla Time of article published Sep 15, 2020

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Cape Town - The Western Cape Liquor Authority (WCLA) said it had conducted 144 investigations into reported contraventions of Disaster Management Act regulations by liquor traders.

The authority said it had suspended 42 licences, dismissed 10 applications, and two applications were pending.

Community Safety MEC Albert Fritz welcomed the WCLA 's efforts to reduce the number of alcohol-related injuries in the province, while noting the importance of reopening the economy.

Fritz said that between March 27 and September 11, 144 investigations had taken place. In total, 54 section 71 matters were placed on the Liquor Licensing Tribunal’s (LLT) case roll.

“Over the last few months, many licensed liquor traders, including bars and restaurants, have been hard-hit by the restrictions on the sale and transportation of alcohol,” Fritz said.

“They have had to be innovative in their businesses to adhere to the restrictions, and ensure the safety and well-being of the public,” Fritz said.

He said of the 42 licences that were suspended, 38 section 71(4) return hearings, as well as further section 20 considerations on 13 of those matters, took place, of which one licence was revoked after finalisation of a section 20 consideration.

Thirty-five suspensions were lifted by the LLT, two suspensions were lifted by other means, including one in a high court application, and one as part of internal appeal tribunal proceeding, and four return hearings were pending.

Distell, which produces and markets alcohol, said it was collaborating with taverns, bars and restaurants to promote responsible alcohol consumption, and was offering R6 million in incentives and support for outlets reopening their doors to trade responsibly.

Richard Rushton, chief executive at Distell, said alcohol was part of a balanced lifestyle when consumed responsibly, but a minority of consumers had a problem with alcohol.

“Distell is playing a partnership role with the government, alongside key industry players, to forge an effective social compact to minimise the long-term effect of alcohol abuse on society as a whole,” Rushton said.

Cape Argus

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