Jubilations as The Heart and Stroke Foundation South Africa CEO, Professor Pamela Naidoo and the Foundation’s Board Members, UCT Chair of Medicine, Professor Ntobeko Ntusi and Sharon Leo, CEO of Helderberg Hospital joined by Ms Marcell Musson of the National Lotteries Commission. Picture: Phando Jikelo/African News Agency(ANA)
Jubilations as The Heart and Stroke Foundation South Africa CEO, Professor Pamela Naidoo and the Foundation’s Board Members, UCT Chair of Medicine, Professor Ntobeko Ntusi and Sharon Leo, CEO of Helderberg Hospital joined by Ms Marcell Musson of the National Lotteries Commission. Picture: Phando Jikelo/African News Agency(ANA)

Mobile clinic focusing on heart disease launched in Khayelitsha

By Mthuthuzeli Ntseku Time of article published Apr 13, 2021

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Cape Town - Khayelitsha residents received the first ever mobile clinic from the Heart and Stroke Foundation South Africa (HSFSA) that will provide essential preventive health screenings.

The clinic, which was unveiled at the Grandmothers Against Poverty and Aids (Gapa) centre, is set to start with older people suffering from non-communicable illnesses and is the first in an intended series of the HSFSA’s mobile clinics to be launched in South Africa.

HSFSA chief executive Pamela Naidoo said that in South Africa, non-communicable diseases such as heart disease, strokes and other circulatory conditions were common. She said the mobile clinic would assist in educating, informing, diagnosing and referring patients, to help lessen the strain on the overburdened health-care system.

“We know these conditions are also some of the most serious comorbidities for Covid-19, therefore our work is particularly essential at this time. We expect the pandemic to be with us for quite a while and therefore it is vital that we equip vulnerable community members to take better care of themselves,” said Naidoo.

Heidelberg hospital chief executive Sharon Leo said heart disease and strokes had a major impact on communities and hospitals. She said hospitals, on a daily basis, had the highest rates of patients treated for non-communicable diseases.

“This is a step in the right direction, not only focusing on illness, but wellness as well, and hopefully will lead to better outcomes. About 215 people die everyday in South Africa from heart disease, and every hour five people have heart attacks, and some of them could have been avoided.

“Poverty and lack of income all contribute to how people engage their own health, which oftentimes might not be a priority for them. For us to achieve wealth and health in our communities we need to be healthy,” she said.

UCT Medical School head Ntobeko Ntusi said the impact of health promotion in terms of empowering people to make decisions about how they lived their lives had a far more powerful impact on outcomes of cardiovascular disease than the tablets that one got at a clinic.

“This intervention will lead not only to improved cardiovascular health in management of non-communicable disease in communities like Khayelitsha and many others, but will in the long term result in the improved health-care of society,” he said.

Gapa health-care worker Siphokazi Sompeta said the mobile clinic would reach out to more elderly people who had been previously referred to clinics. She said they would also conduct numerous wellness days.

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