Members and organisations in the Muslim community said the festival was particularly sombre as they were unable to attend their mosques. File Picture: Henk Kruger/African News Agency (ANA)
Members and organisations in the Muslim community said the festival was particularly sombre as they were unable to attend their mosques. File Picture: Henk Kruger/African News Agency (ANA)

Muslim community shares challenges of celebrating Eid-ul-Adha in the time of Covid-19

By Kristin Engel Time of article published Jul 22, 2021

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Cape Town - The Muslim community were extra cautious celebrating Eid-ul-Adha (Festival of the Sacrifice) on Wednesday with the current Covid-19 alert level 4 regulations in place.

Members and organisations in the Muslim community said the festival was particularly sombre as they were unable to attend their mosques or be with their extended families, and some were grieving for loved one’s that have lost their lives to Covid-19.

Jabulani Community Organisation founder Yasmine Abrahams said it was an emotional day and that it was unfortunate they could not share it, especially the slaughter for their sacrifice, with their loved ones as usual.

Public relations officer Salama Davids said their celebrations included the sacrificial animal slaughter at Platinum Farm, where the meat would be distributed to beneficiaries at the Jabulani Feeding & Learning Centre in Parkwood.

“For the Muslim community, this has not been an easy time because Eid is about unity, community and families coming together, which has been difficult to feel with the pandemic.

“The fact that Muslims cannot perform their pilgrimage has also been really overwhelming. Although it has been extremely difficult, we have found ways to stay united, through social media and through other technologies,” said Davids.

Muslim Judicial Council (MJC) second deputy president Shaykh Riad Fataar said the day was filled with a mixture of happy and sad emotions as they were not able to open mosques and advised people that their sacrificial animal slaughters should only be attended by the immediate household.

Fataar said it was especially heartbreaking to see the increase in deaths during this holy time.

Cape Town mayor Dan Plato also wished the Islamic community well and said the theme of sacrifice in Eid-ul-Adha was relevant to all during Covid-19, in that it was a sacrifice to not be in the physical presence of loved ones to protect their health.

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Cape Argus

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