Premier Helen Zille accepted and signed the memorandum of demands after being called by the marchers. Picture: Sisonke Mlamla/Cape Argus
Cape Town - Hundreds of teachers, governing-body representatives and parents from Khayelitsha schools marched in support of safer schools and communities.

They were stopped by police at Keizersgracht Street, District Six because their permit to march had expired. It had been issued to them on August 6, but they still managed to have their memorandum delivered to Premier Helen Zille. They were planning to march to the legislature.

The group was concerned about an alleged syndicate “targeting” schools in Khayelitsha after several were burgled. March organiser Fundeka Qolo said there was confusion after the march was postponed to Monday due to a taxi strike.

Zille accepted and signed the memorandum of demands after being called by the marchers.

Jackson Bozo, of the Khayelitsha Crime Task Team, said: “The robbery and burglary syndicate is a very serious threat in our schools because it is negatively affecting our children. The educators are often stressed.”

Nine schools which were robbed include Ummangaliso Primary School, Noluthando School of the Deaf, Ntshayelelo Primary School, Lwandle Primary School, Hopolang Primary School, Sivile Primary School, Sobambisana Primary School, Manyano High School and Sangweni High School.

Hundreds of teachers, governing-body representatives and parents from Khayelitsha schools marched in support of safer schools and communities. Video: Sisonke Mlamla/Cape Argus.

The demands call for proper fencing, appointment of security guards, proper access control, proper policing and patrols, among other things.

Western Cape Traditional Leaders Forum representative Zola Dinga said: “Our schools are not safe any more; we urge the Western Cape authorities to take us seriously. We want our children to be safe.”

Ewald Botha, spokesperson for Community Safety MEC Dan Plato, said Plato had yet to receive the memorandum, and would respond once he had studied it.

[email protected]

Cape Argus