Brett Herron examines that vast differences between Green Point the suburb, and Greenpoint the informal settlement. He writes that immoral spending priorities worsen already cavernous divides in one of the world’s most unequal cities. Picture: African News Agency(ANA)
Brett Herron examines that vast differences between Green Point the suburb, and Greenpoint the informal settlement. He writes that immoral spending priorities worsen already cavernous divides in one of the world’s most unequal cities. Picture: African News Agency(ANA)

LETTER: The tale of Cape Town’s two cities, Green Point and Greenpoint

By Opinion Time of article published Sep 9, 2021

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by Brett Herron

Green Point is one of Cape Town’s most picturesque and desirable suburbs. The view of lush green parkland surrounding the World Cup Stadium, with Signal Hill and Table Mountain as a backdrop, Table Bay lapping at its feet, is among the most iconic images of our so-called Mother City.

Greenpoint, on the other hand, is among the city’s most pitiful and under-serviced suburbs. Located in Khayelitsha, sewage flows through filthy and crumbling streets.

Diarrhoea is a leading cause of death in young children. Last week, a toddler died after plunging into an uncovered manhole. Images of this Greenpoint don’t appear in the tourist brochures.

Separated by just 30km of asphalt, the two neighbourhoods are worlds apart. One of world-class infrastructure and services; the other the embodiment of underdevelopment, daily struggle and decay.

Together they symbolise a great tear in the fabric of our society, an old tear by apartheid design and since left unattended – one that, left to fray further, threatens the sustainability of the city.

Among the greatest benefits of fixing diabolical living environments such as Greenpoint and creating a city in which all residents feel they have a stake, will accrue to residents of places such as Green Point where significant property values will be maintained.

Conversely, depriving certain communities of basic rights to shelter, water and safe environments – perhaps to discourage poor people from seeking opportunities in the city – creates a ticking time bomb of injustice and inequality.

But the present city government doesn’t see things that way. Instead of prioritising fixing Greenpoint’s roads and sprucing up the environment, for example, it is spending R44 million on the temporary upgrading of the roads, lawns and parks in Green Point and surrounding areas in order to host a motorcar race. When the race is done, the upgrades will be removed and Green Point will be returned to its present pristine shape – while Greenpoint will remain unfit for human habitation.

It’s not about depriving Green Point of anything; we have the money to fix our city. It is about where and how we choose to spend it. This is about building infrastructure where it is most needed, and about maintaining and repairing infrastructure that is already built.

Immoral spending priorities worsen already cavernous divides in one of the world’s most unequal cities. Instead of bridging the fundamental social, economic, environmental and spatial injustices bequeathed by apartheid, they reinforce separation and division.

Brett Herron examines that vast differences between Green Point the suburb, and Greenpoint the informal settlement. He writes that immoral spending priorities worsen already cavernous divides in one of the world’s most unequal cities. Picture: Ayanda Ndamane/African News Agency(ANA)
Picture: Ayanda Ndamane/African News Agency (ANA)

After two-year-old Imthande Swaartbooi tragically drowned in an uncovered Greenpoint sewer last Sunday, his uncle said community members had pleaded with the City for weeks to replace the manhole cover. The City eventually replaced the cover on Sunday night.

The mayor of Cape Town later turned up at Imthande’s home to “pay respect”, the same mayor once caught on camera stating that people coming to Cape Town from the

Eastern Cape are unable to think for themselves, and bemoaning having to spend ratepayers’ money on “them”.

These are the two cities, one of privilege and one of exclusion, that a generation of ANC and DA leadership have collectively failed to fix. Beyond Green Point and Greenpoint, the picture is similarly dire.

Two months ago, 10-year-old Kayden Marco was playing in a children’s playground near his home in Roosendal , Delft. The dilapidated park’s equipment broke and he was crushed by the metal frame. Though terribly injured, he was still responsive after the accident, but frantic calls for an ambulance yielded nothing.

Eventually, members of the community took him to hospital themselves, but he died an hour later. Like the drain cover outside Imthande’s house, the state of the play park equipment in Kayden’s neighbourhood was reported to the City, but left unrepaired.

It is unthinkable that such events would occur in Durbanville or Rondebosch, but it is not unthinkable in Delft.

And it’s not unthinkable that the City would fail to renew contracts leading to KTC residents’ portable toilets left unemptied, or potable water not being delivered to informal settlements, or the termination of public transport services to Khayelitsha and Mitchells Plain.

The overwhelming majority of Capetonians are decent people who know in their hearts that no human being should live in subhuman conditions. But they are trapped by what they view as a binary choice between keeping the dominant party in power or keeping them out.

No human being can be expected to meekly watch their children dying around them – drowning in sewage, succumbing to diarrhoea or being crushed to death by unmaintained playground equipment.

No mother worthy of the title would treat her children so unequally and unfairly. The “Mother City” is thus desperately unworthy of its epithet.

* Brett Herron is a Good party MPL.

** The views expressed here are not necessarily those of Independent Media.

Cape Argus

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