Independent Online

Friday, May 20, 2022

Like us on FacebookFollow us on TwitterView weather by locationView market indicators

Cape liquor traders want a date with Mayor Geordin Hill-Lewis over new permit proposals

THE Western Cape Liquor Traders Association marched to the Civic Centre to hand over a memorandum in protest against the new permit proposals that will affect informal alcohol traders. | Armand Hough African News Agency (ANA)

THE Western Cape Liquor Traders Association marched to the Civic Centre to hand over a memorandum in protest against the new permit proposals that will affect informal alcohol traders. | Armand Hough African News Agency (ANA)

Published Dec 9, 2021

Share

Cape Town - Liquor traders under the Western Cape Liquor Traders Organisation marched to the Civic Centre to hand over a memorandum of demands against the new permit proposals that would affect them.

Traders said they were concerned by the issue of zoning in their areas, and requested the City of Cape Town to interpret the entertainment by-laws to address the alleged expensive fees charged by the municipality and alleged harassment by Law Enforcement.

Story continues below Advertisement

Traders held placards and sang songs as they moved from Hanover Street to the Civic Centre, hoping to meet with Mayor Geordin Hill-Lewis.

Western Cape Liquor Traders Organisation (WCLTO) secretary Lefa Mapilo, said they wanted to secure a date with Hill-Lewis to address their issues, which include the harmonisation of town planning offices, as they acted as entry points for their industry to function profitably and legally.

Mapilo said they also demanded trading hours that speak directly to the rehabilitation and profitability of the industry.

City Deputy Mayor Eddie Andrews, who welcomed and signed the memorandum, said he would request the mayor’s office to confirm receipt of the memorandum today, and within seven working days they would confirm a date to engage further on resolutions.

Andrews said he understood that township economy was important, and he also understood that they had legislative hoops to jump through.

He said what was outlined in the memorandum was problematic, “because how do you operate a business and meet all those requirements if it’s practically impossible to do that?

Story continues below Advertisement

“It’s also important to understand that from our side, we are the regulatory authority as well, so we will engage and I will write to the mayor and ask him to engage with respective other spheres of government as well, to see these concerns, and how to remedy them,” Andrews said.

One of the traders, Ntombise Matshoba, an 82-year-old granny from Philippi, said she applied for a licence in 2008 and was told it was approved, but must build a place to sell her liquor.

“The Liquor Board told me to do zoning. I did that too, but on the day I was supposed to get my certificate, I was told that I won’t get it because of my street design,” Matshoba said.

Story continues below Advertisement

She said she wanted the money to add to her pension grant that she gets from the government.

“It is difficult for me because I am trying to raise my four grandchildren, as they do not have a mother and father.”

Community Safety MEC Albert Fritz said the Western Cape Liquor Authority was able to monitor liquor licence holders, and therefore their inspections dealt specifically with licensed liquor traders.

Story continues below Advertisement

Fritz said liquor traders who did not have licences fall within the ambit of the police, and called on the police to apply themselves to the policing of illegal liquor traders.

“We know that the amount of illegal liquor traders has increased since the start of Covid-19, and we really need the police to do more in the space,” he said.

[email protected]

Share